Joints etc

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stevep
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Joints etc

Postby stevep » Sat Jun 08, 2013 7:13 pm

Not sure if I'm missing something simple, but if I'm drawing mortice and tenon joints (especially for rebated frames or anything with a slightly complicated cross section) I have always found it time consuming. I usually draw the tenon on one component first, then bring the stile and rail together, change to x ray view, and then draw the mortice on the other component.
All very well but when the head and cill are different cross sections, I have to repeat the process, and again if I do a 3 bay window where the stiles are different to the muntins.
Is there a way of using one component, say the tenon, to automatically 'chop out' the mortice?

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Re: Joints etc

Postby daver » Sat Jun 08, 2013 8:03 pm

Well, you could open the piece with the tenon, copy (Edit>Copy, Ctrl+C, Command-C) the geometry of the tenon and then open the mating piece for editing and use Edit>Paste in place to paste what will now be the mortice geometry. You need to correct the face orientation and delete the skin over the opening, to finish the mortice. I think this method has a lot of merit is a simple Push/Pull operation on the mortice wouldn't work.

My standard approach to mortices is to open the component receiving the mortice and then orbit inside the mating part so I can see the base of the tenon. I trace that with the Rectangle tool and then use Push/Pull to push in the mortice. When I'm just working on my own projects and not showing anyone else, I don't bother with switching into X-ray face style.
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nickw
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Re: Joints etc

Postby nickw » Sat Jun 08, 2013 8:05 pm

The solid tools (View>Toolbars>Solid Tools - is it a pro only feature?) will do some of the work for you, but if you're using components (and if not, why not?) they f**k them up and turn them into groups. :evil: It sounds like you're pretty much doing them the most efficient way that comes out of the box. No doubt there are plugins that will do the job better, but I haven't come across one. Over to you, Dave.
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nickw
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Re: Joints etc

Postby nickw » Sat Jun 08, 2013 8:06 pm

Ah, the delights of posts that cross in the night. :D
Nick Webb, Fine Furniture, Cambridge
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daver
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Re: Joints etc

Postby daver » Sat Jun 08, 2013 8:35 pm

I felt a draft as you passed by, Nick. :)

Yes, one could use the trim tool in the Solid Tools set. I didn't suggest it because as Nick says, that's a pro only feature and even more to the point, it converts components to groups. This would result in even more work than the ways I suggested.

One thing I neglected to mention is that you want to make components that are identical or mirror images (left/right counterparts, for example) related components so you don't have to hit bot sides to complete the mortices.
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Re: Joints etc

Postby stevep » Mon Jun 10, 2013 3:01 pm

daver wrote:Well, you could open the piece with the tenon, copy (Edit>Copy, Ctrl+C, Command-C) the geometry of the tenon and then open the mating piece for editing and use Edit>Paste in place to paste what will now be the mortice geometry.


That's clever, I'll give it a go. What's this face orientation thing though? Does every face have a front and a back to it, and how do you tell the difference/ change it? I've obviously never needed to worry about it up to now.

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Re: Joints etc

Postby daver » Mon Jun 10, 2013 3:59 pm

Yes, every face has a front and a back. The default style template, which I'm guessing you are using, shows front faces as white, or shades of gray when at an angle to the camera and blue for the back. You can correct the face orientation by right clicking on a reversed face and choosing Reverse Faces or right click on a correctly oriented face and choose Orient Faces. Stay on top of the face orientation thing so you don't have to correct it later.

You can see the face colors using either Moonochrome, Shaded, or Shaded with Texture face styles. The latter two only show the face orientation if they haven't been painted.

It seems a lot of folks have difficulty discerning reversed faces (or holes in the surface) with that default blue color. On some monitors it can be difficult to see the difference between a shaded front surface and a back surface. I use a green that I'd never use on purpose in a model. This makes it easy to pick out the reversed faces and holes if they occur.

You can see that in this image.

Image

If you want to change the back face color or anything else about your default template drop me a PM and I'll help you get it sorted out.
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