Rayburn log burning cooker?

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Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby Pinch » Sat May 04, 2013 9:06 am

Not sure where to post this thread...

Help needed please.

One of my client's is selling his Rayburn cooker and I'm thinking about buying it because I'm also thinking about installing a log burner in the workshop before next winter. I know the burner was service in the last year and everything is working as it should.

My question...
Will a Rayburn cooker throw out the same amount of heat into a room as a conventional log burner?

Here are my positives if I go with the Rayburn:

1. It will be much cheaper than a conventional log burner.
2. I believe the Rayburn can be connected up to the existing two radiators already in the workshop?
3. I'll be able to make bacon and egg sarnies during the cold winter months - and an Irish stew simmering away in the oven.
4. And... all going well; the workshop should be lovely and warm.

Negatives:

1. Apart from confirming the heat convecting performance, I really can't think of any.

Can anyone else???

Cheers.

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby senior » Sat May 04, 2013 10:13 am

Negative

You will get fat
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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby thatsnotafestool » Sat May 04, 2013 11:02 am

1 Thought wood burners in workshops were effectively 'free' for fuel as they burn your offcuts?

2 I could be wrong but my understanding was that it needed gravity circulation to work....ie rads upstairs

Rayburn's are designed to keep their heat IN ! Not radiate it like a log burner.
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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby Pinch » Sat May 04, 2013 11:14 am

senior wrote:Negative

You will get fat


:lol: I'll do a salad on the side.

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby Pinch » Sat May 04, 2013 11:25 am

thatsnotafestool wrote:1 Thought wood burners in workshops were effectively 'free' for fuel as they burn your offcuts?

2 I could be wrong but my understanding was that it needed gravity circulation to work....ie rads upstairs

Rayburn's are designed to keep their heat IN ! Not radiate it like a log burner.


Absolutely... Although I would buy in a stock of seasoned hardwood logs too.

Ah, that's interesting about the gravity insulation - yep, that sounds logical. If this is the case, I'm wondering whether the 'designed to keep the heat in' bit is an integral insulation which might be removable - hopefully. I know they radiate quite a bit of heat, but like you say, not designed to radiate as a log burner - hmmmm...

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby mrgrimsdale » Sat May 04, 2013 11:47 am

Tiny firebox would need small logs/sticks stoking every few minutes if you run it hot.
Insulated so doesn't release much heat
Crap cooker - all Aga/Rayburn owners also have hobs, microwaves etc etc - often another complete cooker as "stand-by" i.e. needed most of the time.

designed to keep the heat in' bit is an integral insulation which might be removable
The box is filled with insulation. You could remove it if you dismantled it. Might be a prob doing this, bigger prob putting it back together what with seized threads, burnt out components etc.

All in all it's a non starter. If you get it free sell it on a.s.a.p. or scrap it. 3cwts?

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby thatsnotafestool » Sat May 04, 2013 12:45 pm

Pinch wrote:
thatsnotafestool wrote:1 Thought wood burners in workshops were effectively 'free' for fuel as they burn your offcuts?

2 I could be wrong but my understanding was that it needed gravity circulation to work....ie rads upstairs

Rayburn's are designed to keep their heat IN ! Not radiate it like a log burner.


Absolutely... Although I would buy in a stock of seasoned hardwood logs too.

Ah, that's interesting about the gravity insulation - yep, that sounds logical. If this is the case, I'm wondering whether the 'designed to keep the heat in' bit is an integral insulation which might be removable - hopefully. I know they radiate quite a bit of heat, but like you say, not designed to radiate as a log burner - hmmmm...


It is.
The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time.
Friedrich Nietzsche

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby woodsmith » Sat May 04, 2013 1:09 pm

I assume this is a wood fired Rayburn, because I haven't seen one of those? Judith was brought up in an old farmhouse with a solid fuel Rayburn. It did take a fair bit of stoking up and I would imagine a wood one would be worse (only the same as a log burner though) but the advantage was that you could stoke it up and open up the flue to get it to run hotter relatively quickly.

We have an electric Aga and it came in lots of pieces as it weighs a tonne, once the sides and inners were assembled they filled it with mica insulation before fitting the top. Even if you want this as a heating source I would still fit the insulation (if the solid fuel cookers have it) as you can always open the oven door if you want to let more heat out.

The Aga puts out enough heat to keep our 7x8m kitchen and main hall warm, but not hot, through the winter. If you put a couple of gravity fed rads at a high level you could mount an air cleaner near them to distribute the heat.

If you have the space I don't think it would be a bad idea to have one, they are designed to burn safely in a house, there would always be somewhere warm to put things to dry and full breakfast cooked on a Rayburn would be a real bonus :D
Keith

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby bobh » Sat May 04, 2013 5:13 pm

Hi there, been lurking for a while and just signed up after reading this.
A rayburn would be great if you can get it for a reasonable price, I've just spent the last 2 winters in a cottage with a rayburn royale, it was great, we ran it 24 hours a day all year using mostly wood but adding half a scuttle of coal overnight, it stayed in with no problems. This did all the cooking, most of the heating (passive) and heated the water (lots of it!) We didn't have any radiators off it but I know it is possible.
For heating your workshop it will be ideal as long as you have the space, they take a little more room than a woodburner.
As for the heat convection I think it will be fine, if you want a bit more heat released from it just open the oven doors and lift the hob covers, no need to remove any insulation.
hope this helps, I would fit one immediately if I had the opportunity.
Bob
P.S. senior is right, you will get fat :lol:

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby Pinch » Sat May 04, 2013 5:44 pm

mrgrimsdale wrote:Tiny firebox would need small logs/sticks stoking every few minutes if you run it hot.
Insulated so doesn't release much heat
Crap cooker - all Aga/Rayburn owners also have hobs, microwaves etc etc - often another complete cooker as "stand-by" i.e. needed most of the time.

designed to keep the heat in' bit is an integral insulation which might be removable
The box is filled with insulation. You could remove it if you dismantled it. Might be a prob doing this, bigger prob putting it back together what with seized threads, burnt out components etc.

All in all it's a non starter. If you get it free sell it on a.s.a.p. or scrap it. 3cwts?


Thanks Jacob - I'm going to go for it. I'm thinking with my belly now :shock:

I shall also start a new WIP thread when I start the installation.

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby Pinch » Sat May 04, 2013 5:47 pm

thatsnotafestool wrote:
Pinch wrote:
thatsnotafestool wrote:1 Thought wood burners in workshops were effectively 'free' for fuel as they burn your offcuts?

2 I could be wrong but my understanding was that it needed gravity circulation to work....ie rads upstairs

Rayburn's are designed to keep their heat IN ! Not radiate it like a log burner.


Absolutely... Although I would buy in a stock of seasoned hardwood logs too.

Ah, that's interesting about the gravity insulation - yep, that sounds logical. If this is the case, I'm wondering whether the 'designed to keep the heat in' bit is an integral insulation which might be removable - hopefully. I know they radiate quite a bit of heat, but like you say, not designed to radiate as a log burner - hmmmm...


It is.


Goodie... but I might just leave it in :?

I'll see how it goes on performance and if the the room temperature isn't where I want it, I'll readdress the potential issue.

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby Pinch » Sat May 04, 2013 5:58 pm

woodsmith wrote:I assume this is a wood fired Rayburn, because I haven't seen one of those? Judith was brought up in an old farmhouse with a solid fuel Rayburn. It did take a fair bit of stoking up and I would imagine a wood one would be worse (only the same as a log burner though) but the advantage was that you could stoke it up and open up the flue to get it to run hotter relatively quickly.

We have an electric Aga and it came in lots of pieces as it weighs a tonne, once the sides and inners were assembled they filled it with mica insulation before fitting the top. Even if you want this as a heating source I would still fit the insulation (if the solid fuel cookers have it) as you can always open the oven door if you want to let more heat out.

The Aga puts out enough heat to keep our 7x8m kitchen and main hall warm, but not hot, through the winter. If you put a couple of gravity fed rads at a high level you could mount an air cleaner near them to distribute the heat.

If you have the space I don't think it would be a bad idea to have one, they are designed to burn safely in a house, there would always be somewhere warm to put things to dry and full breakfast cooked on a Rayburn would be a real bonus :D


Yes, a wood fired Rayburn. I don't have any probs with the stoking etc as I've had several open fires over the past years - part of the charm. I think overall, the Rayburn is going to be spot on. I wouldn't actually want the shop to be too hot either; I would find a hot working environment very uncomfortable. And of course like you mentioned... a full breakfast on a Rayburn in the shop - bliss 8-)

The only negative with the cooking bit... the aroma is going to arouse my fellow neighbouring workers. I might have to put up a menu board ;)

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby york33 » Sat May 04, 2013 8:01 pm

Aga and Rayburns rock!

Most Rayburns have a boiler, they have the capacity to heat a whole house full of rads, depending on spec/size of boiler, so it may be oversized for your purposes, depends on the size of your workshop? Was it running whilst hooked up to rads? If he's ran it dry the boiler may be shagged.

You can run them gravity fed with sufficient head, or pumped, careful you don't let it overheat, ie at least one rad always on/circulating, no thermostat.

We've got an aga, solid fuel (Anthracite not wood), took the boiler out and just let it heat downstairs by convection, which it does really well. Ovens are great, don't really use the hotplates other than to warm my hat on in winter!

Don't dismantle it to move, Rayburns move whole, Agas move in bits, is the general rule!

You don't say what age it is, but watch the insulation, personally I'd leave it be unless you need to. There's potential for asbestos presence in it I would think?

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby houtslager » Sat May 04, 2013 10:22 pm

JUST GET IT IN, HOOK IT UP and enjoy your cooked bacon and eggs

I've got 2 and had one going full chat over last winter, I would not have a shop w/o a Rayburn if there's a chimney.

hth

K
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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby mrgrimsdale » Sun May 05, 2013 4:43 am

houtslager wrote:JUST GET IT IN, HOOK IT UP and enjoy your cooked bacon and eggs

I've got 2 and had one going full chat over last winter, I would not have a shop w/o a Rayburn if there's a chimney.

hth

K

Yebbut one thing Raybirn/Agas are particularly bad at is bacon and eggs (or any frying) unless you have stoked it up 24 hours in advance and kept it going, with solid fuel. Any normal cooker you just turn it on and off whenever you want to and don't have to heat the kitchen as well and you don't need special expensive pans.

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby Pinch » Sun May 05, 2013 8:44 am

york33 wrote:Aga and Rayburns rock!

Most Rayburns have a boiler, they have the capacity to heat a whole house full of rads, depending on spec/size of boiler, so it may be oversized for your purposes, depends on the size of your workshop? Was it running whilst hooked up to rads? If he's ran it dry the boiler may be shagged.

You can run them gravity fed with sufficient head, or pumped, careful you don't let it overheat, ie at least one rad always on/circulating, no thermostat.

We've got an aga, solid fuel (Anthracite not wood), took the boiler out and just let it heat downstairs by convection, which it does really well. Ovens are great, don't really use the hotplates other than to warm my hat on in winter!

Don't dismantle it to move, Rayburns move whole, Agas move in bits, is the general rule!

You don't say what age it is, but watch the insulation, personally I'd leave it be unless you need to. There's potential for asbestos presence in it I would think?


My workshop is fairly modest (460sqft) but the Rayburn won't be intrusive at all - plenty of room and I have just the place for it. Yep, I'm sure it was running as it was meant to in the house. I know it was serviced in the last year and it's in good nick. I don't fully understand the plumbing stuff :? (I have lots of blonde moments when it comes to plumbing or electrical stuff).

Ah that's good; I wasn't sure about dismantling or leave it as whole for moving - cheers!

I'm not sure on its age - 10 years I think. It all looks clean and good. I wish I took a picture of it on Friday, but it looks exactly like this one... and I do like the colour - sort of 'British Racing Green' :D

Image

Good advice on the insulation - I didn't think about any asbestos issues. Nice one.

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby Pinch » Sun May 05, 2013 8:45 am

houtslager wrote:JUST GET IT IN, HOOK IT UP and enjoy your cooked bacon and eggs

I've got 2 and had one going full chat over last winter, I would not have a shop w/o a Rayburn if there's a chimney.

hth

K


:D Will do Sir! Nice one.

I shall start a new thread when installation begins.

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby Pinch » Sun May 05, 2013 8:48 am

mrgrimsdale wrote:
houtslager wrote:JUST GET IT IN, HOOK IT UP and enjoy your cooked bacon and eggs

I've got 2 and had one going full chat over last winter, I would not have a shop w/o a Rayburn if there's a chimney.

hth

K

Yebbut one thing Raybirn/Agas are particularly bad at is bacon and eggs (or any frying) unless you have stoked it up 24 hours in advance and kept it going, with solid fuel. Any normal cooker you just turn it on and off whenever you want to and don't have to heat the kitchen as well and you don't need special expensive pans.


Oh right - no probs... I'll give it a go anyway. I can always throw some sausages into the oven - I prefer these little fellas oven cooked. And I won't tell the Rabbi :shock:

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby houtslager » Sun May 05, 2013 6:32 pm

BUT , if you don't want it I'll come over and take it your hands for you :D

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby Pinch » Mon May 06, 2013 3:11 pm

houtslager wrote:BUT , if you don't want it I'll come over and take it your hands for you :D

K


I think I'll keep it thanks :D ;)

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby Pinch » Mon May 06, 2013 3:19 pm

I've been in the shop today and taken a couple of pics of where the Rayburn is going live.

Pretty much where the chair is...
Image

The outside might be interesting with a flue behind all that growth. I'll have to cut it back a bit. Although, there is a space on the other side of the hedge, which is where the oil tank is situated.
Image

The plan is to make a formwork concrete plinth and the flue will elbow out through the wall and then up just above the roof line with a cap on it.

If anyone can see potential issues or perhaps a better plan, please share.

Cheers. 8-)

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby mark270981 » Mon May 06, 2013 7:58 pm

Your space and outside space looks ace.

Is that home? Or rented?
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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby woodsmith » Mon May 06, 2013 8:58 pm

You will need to check how high the flue needs to be because I think they recommend it to be higher than the roof ridge.
Keith

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby Pinch » Tue May 07, 2013 5:37 am

bobh wrote:Hi there, been lurking for a while and just signed up after reading this.
A rayburn would be great if you can get it for a reasonable price, I've just spent the last 2 winters in a cottage with a rayburn royale, it was great, we ran it 24 hours a day all year using mostly wood but adding half a scuttle of coal overnight, it stayed in with no problems. This did all the cooking, most of the heating (passive) and heated the water (lots of it!) We didn't have any radiators off it but I know it is possible.
For heating your workshop it will be ideal as long as you have the space, they take a little more room than a woodburner.
As for the heat convection I think it will be fine, if you want a bit more heat released from it just open the oven doors and lift the hob covers, no need to remove any insulation.
hope this helps, I would fit one immediately if I had the opportunity.
Bob
P.S. senior is right, you will get fat :lol:


Hi Bob, my apologies, I didn't see your post before. I've just been refreshing my memory reading the above and noticed your posting.

That's great and very reassuring. I'm getting it for £70 which is a pretty good deal I think. I followed an identical one on ebay this weekend which sold for £380. I did wonder if lifting the hob covers would make any difference - nice one. I can't wait to get it in now and indulge in a full English 8-)

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby Pinch » Tue May 07, 2013 5:43 am

mark270981 wrote:Your space and outside space looks ace.

Is that home? Or rented?


Hi Mark and thanks. Yep, I rent the shop which is on a farm and only a few miles down the lane from home. It's a great little set up - the old buildings are former stables which now form a courtyard of various workshops including me (woody stuff) an upholsterer, locksmith, picture framer, jewellery maker and a few others...

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby Pinch » Tue May 07, 2013 5:46 am

woodsmith wrote:You will need to check how high the flue needs to be because I think they recommend it to be higher than the roof ridge.


Yep nice one... I'm going to research this. I think this depends on opening roof windows (dormer or velux type) and as there aren't any on this side of the roof, I'm hoping I only need to go about 900mm above the fascia line. I'll check it out.

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby woodsmith » Tue May 07, 2013 6:44 am

Pinch wrote:
woodsmith wrote:You will need to check how high the flue needs to be because I think they recommend it to be higher than the roof ridge.


Yep nice one... I'm going to research this. I think this depends on opening roof windows (dormer or velux type) and as there aren't any on this side of the roof, I'm hoping I only need to go about 900mm above the fascia line. I'll check it out.



When we looked into having an oil Aga I think they wanted it to be 14 ft above the stove to ensure it would "draw" which would have put it high above the roofline. There is a downdraft effect at the eaves which means you have to put the flue well up into the air. You will normally need to tie it into the roof with steel rods to keep it stable.
Keith

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby mattty » Tue May 07, 2013 11:56 am

http://www.stovesonline.co.uk/flue-outlet-height.html

I've had an aga for 12 years and although expensive to run, all our family clothes are dried via it, it provides an extra heat source and despite what Grim says is a great cooker- We don't have an additional cooker though we do have a rarely used microwave.
Cheers, Matt.

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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby senior » Tue May 07, 2013 5:07 pm

mattty wrote:http://www.stovesonline.co.uk/flue-outlet-height.html

I've had an aga for 12 years and although expensive to run, all our family clothes are dried via it, it provides an extra heat source and despite what Grim says is a great cooker- We don't have an additional cooker though we do have a rarely used microwave.


What size is it Matty, 1500mm six oven, how many pairs of your pants can you hang on the handle, one, or at a squeeze one and a sock? :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: Rayburn log burning cooker?

Postby Pinch » Fri May 10, 2013 6:39 pm

senior wrote:
mattty wrote:http://www.stovesonline.co.uk/flue-outlet-height.html

I've had an aga for 12 years and although expensive to run, all our family clothes are dried via it, it provides an extra heat source and despite what Grim says is a great cooker- We don't have an additional cooker though we do have a rarely used microwave.


What size is it Matty, 1500mm six oven, how many pairs of your pants can you hang on the handle, one, or at a squeeze one and a sock? :lol: :lol: :lol:


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