Tool & machine protection coatings/oils

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ondablade
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Tool & machine protection coatings/oils

Postby ondablade » Sun May 04, 2014 1:17 pm

This is a request for suggestions for a corrosion preventing readily available oil or other compound, but also a bit of a long story so far/share some info deal.

I've tended to use camellia oil and find it works well for corrosion prevention on more or less anything metal - hand tools, machines, stored steel parts etc. A microfibre cloth lightly sprayed all over with oil (not wet) kept in a zip up plastic bag is easy to grab, and leaves an instant light sheen/no wetness sort of coat on whatever. Camellia oil is otherwise known as tea seed oil or tsubaki oil - but NOT tea tree oil. It's got the claimed advantages of being good for the skin (is used on the hair and skin in Japan), of not curing/hardening/going rancid, of not marking wood (unless you leave the oily rag on it for hours), and of not messing with finishes.

Trouble is i've got fed up with paying daft amounts of money for small amounts of what is a commodity material packed down into tiny little bottles and sold at insane prices, plus it's not available locally and shipping charges add insult to injury. I'm looking for a cost effective commonly/locally available source for say a litre at a time and/or an alternative fitting the same bill.

Camellia oil is used in cooking (not commonly), and in aromatherapy, but I've had no luck finding a local stockist for the former. (Asian supermarkets inthe US apparently routinely carry it) Suppliers for the latter are up to the same tricks - hyping it to death, and marking up tiny amounts accordingly.

Commercially produced corrosion preventive sprays and the like are also crazily expensive, have who knows what in them, and don't seem to do any better than the natural oil. I've concluded it's waste of time reading the infomercials (and that's being generous) published in the woodworking mags - they inevitably push commercial products.

Lie Nielsen these days are selling jojoba oil for tool protection, so chances are it works well. Trouble is that being used mostly in the cosmetics/make believe/wanna be area it's priced similarly to camellia. It turns to a soft wax below 10 - 15 deg C too.

Some mention canola/rape/mustard seed oil as being a good (widely available and cheap) option, but there's not much information about and i'm wary of possibly negative health implications of the erucic acid it contains. (apparently one of the ingredients in the process to produce mustard gas - it seems to mess with cell, eye and enzyme process functions, and may lead to various neurological and energy related health problems - and never mind the 'healthy billing the stuff gets from vested interests).

Baby oil is another option that comes up from time to time - although quite why we should cover a bay in mineral oil i'm not sure.

Against that it's seemingly the toxic content that makes possible a natural or other oil that isn't subject to biological breakdown/going rancid - and it's this latter tendency it seems that makes many natural oils unsuitable for this use...

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Re: Tool & machine protection coatings/oils

Postby 9fingers » Sun May 04, 2014 2:02 pm

I have written on several forums how to do this economically.
For hand tools, a cupboard with door that shut but not air tight, only needs a low power heat source inside. I recommend 2 filament light bulbs in series across the mains. These will last almost indefinitely and the power output/consumption for the two bulbs is half the rated power of each of the pair. 2 x 60W bulbs =30W - approx £30 per year at UK leccy prices.

For machine tables, basic physics ( which most people seem to have either forgotten or could not be arsed to pay attention) tells that if a surface is just slightly warmer that the surrounding air, then water will not condense out and cause rust.
It is the same principle as mounting an empty burglar alarm box in full view - tells the rust to Foxtrot Oscar and go elsewhere.
Mounting a few aluminium clad wire wound resistors from flea bay etc run from a battery charger or similar mounted on the underside of cast machine table will keep it rust free. Use something like 5-10 watts per sq ft.
Power = volts squared divided by resistance
example 22 ohms running on 12 volts gives 6.5 watts
or 15 ohms on 12v will give 9.6 watts

1 watt costs £1 per year but you wont necessarily need it on all year.

I have used this method in my engineering worshop which is un heated and has large air bricks in a single skin brick wall. my lathe is 35 years old from new and protected this way and there is not a single rust mark, similarly my 30 year old milling machine.

It really works!!!

Bob
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ondablade
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Re: Tool & machine protection coatings/oils

Postby ondablade » Sun May 04, 2014 3:17 pm

Hi Bob. Thanks for that - I use a cabinet and its a very important principle. There's times however when i can still use some sort of rust prevention on stuff that can't be/isn't protected in that way - hence the query.

Camellia oil does the job just fine - the post is just on the off chance that it may be possible to find something a little more cost effective. Failing options I'll just bite the bullet and pay my €59 for 1.8L from Germany and forget about it for years: http://www.fine-tools.com/pflege.htm…. (click miscellaneous/toolcare/ to 1.8L camellia oil mid page)

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Re: Tool & machine protection coatings/oils

Postby Giff » Tue May 06, 2014 8:37 pm

Liberon wax is very good http://www.axminster.co.uk/liberon-lubricating-wax. I found it best to heat it slightly ( to a liquid ) wipe it on and it seem to last a long time.

ondablade
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Re: Tool & machine protection coatings/oils

Postby ondablade » Wed May 07, 2014 12:28 am

Ta G. DIdn't know it existed, and not so badly priced either.

Interstingly enough there's quite a few zeroing in on compound that are on the transition between wax and oils. Some of the more traditional US guys use a beeswax and baby oil(?) blend. The jojoba oil mentioned above that Lie Nielsen are offering is reportedly in this space too in that it starts to turn into wax at around 10 deg C.

There's a lot of uses for a good compound like this - for lubricating tables, blades and the like as well as rust prevention. Helps a lot too if they help/are good for the skin...

Giff
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Re: Tool & machine protection coatings/oils

Postby Giff » Wed May 07, 2014 9:14 am

Yes I use it mainly for lubricating the table saw and PT. It is surprising the difference it makes.After using it for a while I though my feed rollers or had gone on my PT but a re-coat and the timber just slid through……and the beds don't go rusty ! Geoff

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Re: Tool & machine protection coatings/oils

Postby Roger-M » Wed May 07, 2014 9:41 am

Giff wrote:Yes I use it mainly for lubricating the table saw and PT. It is surprising the difference it makes.After using it for a while I though my feed rollers or had gone on my PT but a re-coat and the timber just slid through……and the beds don't go rusty ! Geoff


+1 for Liberon Machine wax. Just get in the habit of wiping the cast iron surfaces over with it at the end of each session.
Cheers, Roger

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Re: Tool & machine protection coatings/oils

Postby jegsii43 » Wed Oct 11, 2017 8:11 am

Hii,
Any advice how I can get rid of my acne/pimples?
I prefer not using medicated creams. But I need something to get them off.

Also which cream/lotion is good as prevention, however, I do have sensitive skin?

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Andys Woodshed
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Re: Tool & machine protection coatings/oils

Postby Andys Woodshed » Wed Oct 11, 2017 9:08 pm

jegsii43 wrote:Hii,
Any advice how I can get rid of my acne/pimples?
I prefer not using medicated creams. But I need something to get them off.

Also which cream/lotion is good as prevention, however, I do have sensitive skin?


I'm sure someone could come up with a suitable reply :lol:

Giff
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Re: Tool & machine protection coatings/oils

Postby Giff » Wed Oct 11, 2017 10:25 pm

Paper bag with eye slits ?

9fingers
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Re: Tool & machine protection coatings/oils

Postby 9fingers » Wed Oct 11, 2017 10:38 pm

If you have acne and pimples on your tool I'd seek medical help at the local STD centre!
Bob
Information on induction motors and inverters here
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_GZrX ... sp=sharing" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Tool & machine protection coatings/oils

Postby promhandicam » Thu Oct 12, 2017 11:01 pm

Wurth do a product called Woodslide which should do what you want. Comes in an aerosol can or you can buy a 5l container and then presumably decant it into a spray bottle. I use it on the beds of my p/t and it works very well.

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Re: Tool & machine protection coatings/oils

Postby promhandicam » Thu Oct 12, 2017 11:02 pm

oops - just realised this is a zombie thread resurrected by some spotty herbert (literally)


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