Tulipwood or unsorted

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Meccarroll
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Re: Tulipwood or unsorted

Postby Meccarroll » Mon Dec 18, 2017 8:33 am

podengo wrote:Tulipwood is pretty good for interior joinery, Ive never had issues.

I find there isnt much difference between tulipwood and unsorted redwood by the time you factor in the filling, sanding, knotting etc costs.

Alteranitvely try red grandis from Timbmet.


Good to mention the merits regarding Filling etc and about use for interior work. They help to clarify other aspects that can affect the final cost and time involved not just the initial outlay for the timber.

I've worked in a few joinery shops in my earlier days as a carpenter and tulipwood is not a wood that I have personally seen or used in any of them but I guess times are changing and tulipwood does seem to be quite a favourite in joinery shops around the country for interior work nowadays. Probably about time to give it a try.

Mark

thatsnotafestool
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Re: Tulipwood or unsorted

Postby thatsnotafestool » Mon Dec 18, 2017 8:38 am

podengo wrote:.....
I find there isnt much difference between tulipwood and unsorted redwood by the time you factor in the filling, sanding, knotting etc costs.
.....


Ah but if you're time rich and cash poor like me then that's not so much an issue ! :D
The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time.
Friedrich Nietzsche

Louis84
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Re: Tulipwood or unsorted

Postby Louis84 » Sat Dec 30, 2017 6:13 pm

As some have suggested, I would deffinitely use finger jointed / laminated softwood for any internal work like that. Nice and straight, planes up beautifully.

I was not that impressed with tulipwood. It bowed, swelled, expanded and shrunk. Only ever seen it used for skirts, archs and small cabinets but not doors(?).

Grandis would be well over the top it's better suited for external work and the cost reflects this.
Measure twice, measure thrice, cut once, glue a bit back on, cut again, bit of filler, done


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