Resurfacing a coffee table

General wood working tips, tricks and ideas. Anything that doesn't belong elsewhere can be discussed here.
Post Reply
cheddarman
New Member
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri May 10, 2019 5:41 pm
Contact:

Resurfacing a coffee table

Post by cheddarman » Sat Feb 08, 2020 9:21 pm

Not sure resurfacing is the right term but, I've got a 30yo Cherry coffee table, 4' X 20" and it's showing its years with scratches and marks all over.
What would be the best procedure to restore it to its former glory? Fine sanding g and re polishing??

Cheers

thatsnotafestool
Subscriber
Posts: 4999
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2007 5:27 pm
Location: Oop North where it rains
Contact:

Re: Resurfacing a coffee table

Post by thatsnotafestool » Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:18 am

Yes provided it's a solid top and not veneered. If the latter then you can still sand etc but take care not to sand through the veneer.

When you say polishing, do you mean French polishing 'cos that is a skill. There's other stuff out there you can use.
The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time.
Friedrich Nietzsche

cheddarman
New Member
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri May 10, 2019 5:41 pm
Contact:

Re: Resurfacing a coffee table

Post by cheddarman » Sun Feb 09, 2020 9:00 am

Restoring the shine, that's where I'm not sure. Varnish would probably look a bit too shiny so I'm thinking multi layers of wax?

thatsnotafestool
Subscriber
Posts: 4999
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2007 5:27 pm
Location: Oop North where it rains
Contact:

Re: Resurfacing a coffee table

Post by thatsnotafestool » Sun Feb 09, 2020 9:23 am

I like Chestnut Microcrystalline wax. Seems to repel water quite well. If you want a more tougher surface then Rustins Plastic Coating is god. Don't let the name put you off.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rustins-PCGL10 ... B002HMXR18
The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time.
Friedrich Nietzsche

cheddarman
New Member
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri May 10, 2019 5:41 pm
Contact:

Re: Resurfacing a coffee table

Post by cheddarman » Sun Feb 09, 2020 1:34 pm

thatsnotafestool wrote:
Sun Feb 09, 2020 9:23 am
I like Chestnut Microcrystalline wax. Seems to repel water quite well. If you want a more tougher surface then Rustins Plastic Coating is god. Don't let the name put you off.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rustins-PCGL10 ... B002HMXR18
many thanks, most helpful!!

Meccarroll
Subscriber
Posts: 878
Joined: Wed Nov 27, 2013 6:37 am
Contact:

Re: Resurfacing a coffee table

Post by Meccarroll » Sun Feb 09, 2020 6:18 pm

You can always use a varnish coat to seal the surface then use wire wool soaked in wax to cut the shine off the varnish then buff to finish.

cheddarman
New Member
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri May 10, 2019 5:41 pm
Contact:

Re: Resurfacing a coffee table

Post by cheddarman » Sun Feb 09, 2020 10:13 pm

Meccarroll wrote:
Sun Feb 09, 2020 6:18 pm
You can always use a varnish coat to seal the surface then use wire wool soaked in wax to cut the shine off the varnish then buff to finish.
Sounds good Meccarrol, I presume a very thin varnish.
Can one not just use wax, loads of coats over time?

9fingers
Subscriber
Posts: 1144
Joined: Tue Oct 23, 2007 12:27 pm
Location: Romsey, Hampshire UK
Contact:

Re: Resurfacing a coffee table

Post by 9fingers » Mon Feb 10, 2020 8:06 am

2parts pu varnish 1 part white spirit
I use three coats de-nibbing between coats and wax applied with 0000 wire wool.
Bob
Information on induction motors and inverters here
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_GZrX ... sp=sharing" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Image

woodsmith
Subscriber
Posts: 2094
Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2007 8:02 am
Location: Shrewsbury
Contact:

Re: Resurfacing a coffee table

Post by woodsmith » Mon Feb 10, 2020 9:20 am

A wax, on its own, finish soon marks. A diluted and applied thinly varnish as 9fingers suggests is good or you could use Osmo Polyx, again applied thinly in several coats.
Keith

Meccarroll
Subscriber
Posts: 878
Joined: Wed Nov 27, 2013 6:37 am
Contact:

Re: Resurfacing a coffee table

Post by Meccarroll » Mon Feb 10, 2020 10:11 am

Yes you can use wax on it's own and some wax formulas are better than others at protecting the surface of wood from stains etc. Using a varnish first helps to seal the surface of the wood and if done correctly as Bob states won't detract from the waxed finish look once completed.

cheddarman
New Member
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri May 10, 2019 5:41 pm
Contact:

Re: Resurfacing a coffee table

Post by cheddarman » Tue Feb 11, 2020 5:02 pm

OK, couple of thin varnish first, rubbed down and the get the elbow grease going with the wax!

For initial rubbing down I presume fine emery/sand paper - like very fine and very lightly, just enough to remove marks, or better to go right back to bare wood?

I think the top is solid Cherry, not veneered.

thatsnotafestool
Subscriber
Posts: 4999
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2007 5:27 pm
Location: Oop North where it rains
Contact:

Re: Resurfacing a coffee table

Post by thatsnotafestool » Tue Feb 11, 2020 5:13 pm

Back to bare wood as you don't know how the existing finish will react to whatever you're putting on. It's why ROS sanders were invented.
The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time.
Friedrich Nietzsche

Meccarroll
Subscriber
Posts: 878
Joined: Wed Nov 27, 2013 6:37 am
Contact:

Re: Resurfacing a coffee table

Post by Meccarroll » Wed Feb 12, 2020 4:37 am

If you use the right sandpaper for each stage of sanding it will make life a lot easier. Before you do any sanding clean the surface with white spirit first to remove any wax or other residue because this will clog the sandpaper and prevent you from making much progress. I have not had any problem using PU varnish on previously coated wood surfaces myself but as Roger has said you may run into trouble with none compatible finishes so either test an area or sand right back to wood. I have put a link to a quick guide about sandpaper, it will give you an idea of what paper to use. Cheap sandpapers are a waste of time and not very effective at removing waste material because they degrade easily, the grit comes away from the backing paper making them none effective.
sandpaper.jpg
Have a read of this link: https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/choose- ... er-3536493

cheddarman
New Member
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri May 10, 2019 5:41 pm
Contact:

Re: Resurfacing a coffee table

Post by cheddarman » Wed Feb 12, 2020 9:33 am

Many thanks Meccarroll, most helpful! Fell armed with everything I need now so will have a go.
I'll keep you guys posted...................

Post Reply