Sliding sash repairs

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Meccarroll
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Sliding sash repairs

Post by Meccarroll » Sun Oct 11, 2020 3:43 pm

Hi all I initially posted about this job around a couple of years ago but could not do the work until recently, I thought some on here might fing it interesting.

Photo of rotten Ground Floor Sliding Sash Window, quite a few on here suggested only a new window was an option. I did put that to the client but they went for a repair job instead as it was about a third of the price of a new window.

Original window before and during repairs:
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Meccarroll
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Re: Sliding sash repairs

Post by Meccarroll » Sun Oct 11, 2020 3:52 pm

Original window after repairs:
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Meccarroll
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Re: Sliding sash repairs

Post by Meccarroll » Sun Oct 11, 2020 4:01 pm

Repairs to the bottom sash, one stile and bottom rail replaced,the new timber above is part of the repairs, I use coloured crayons to mark the rebate and moulds as it makes them easy to identify:

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woodsmith
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Re: Sliding sash repairs

Post by woodsmith » Mon Oct 12, 2020 8:14 am

Very nice job. We need a “like” button!
Keith

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Re: Sliding sash repairs

Post by thatsnotafestool » Tue Oct 13, 2020 12:53 pm

Excellent repair. indeed. I always used to remove the bottom 1/2" of the parting bead (and make good in the cill) as it forms a water trap.
The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time.
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Re: Sliding sash repairs

Post by Mike Jordan » Wed Oct 14, 2020 1:44 pm

With that level of skill and a few pounds worth of timber,it would be quicker and better to make a new one.

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Re: Sliding sash repairs

Post by jfc » Fri Oct 16, 2020 7:54 pm

Nice repair . I have never understood why this kind of thing isnt taught in schools . when i was at school we made a wood metal and plastic train . What good is that for life ? How to repair a window or door is far more useful .

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Re: Sliding sash repairs

Post by Meccarroll » Tue Oct 20, 2020 8:59 am

woodsmith » Mon Oct 12, 2020 7:14 am

Very nice job./quote]

Thank you for your kind comment Woodsmith, like buttons would be quick.
by thatsnotafestool » Tue Oct 13, 2020 11:53 am

Excellent repair.
Thank you Roger, in the past I have often thought, like you, that it might be advantageous to allow the water to flow easily past the bottom of the parting bead also the outer box frame but I keep to the traditional look and follow through to the cill.
by Mike Jordan » Wed Oct 14, 2020 12:44 pm

With that level of skill and a few pounds worth of timber,it would be quicker and better to make a new one.
Mike I believe you are correct a new window would be a better job but the cost would increase for the client so a repair was requested. I did some similar repairs for the same customer on different windows about 11 years ago and they are all standing up well so the customer has a good idea of what is possible. To be honest I did not make enough money on this job as the repairs were quite extensive and took longer than I had expected. A new window would have been better time and money wise for me.
by jfc » Fri Oct 16, 2020 6:54 pm

Nice repair ./quote]

Cheers Jason, some forms of woodwork are becoming a bit of a dying art I'm afraid. I see a lot of youngsters on sites nowadays with masses of power tools, masses of bravado but sadly they do not seem to be able to use hand tools effectively. In my opinion, site based/gained NVQ's have created a mass of semi skilled workers not craftsmen.

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Re: Sliding sash repairs

Post by Mike Jordan » Sat Oct 24, 2020 8:56 am

Without wishing to be offensive in any way, I feel that you are not benefiting yourself or the status of the trade by not refusing to spend time on this type of work. As you point out there are few good craftsmen about. Those semi skilled people you mention are probably charging an hourly rate higher than yours and leaving the skilled work alone.
My approach in the past was to draw the line at any window where the rot extended to the pully stiles, there is always other work to be had which beats raking out rot.
If I take my car for a service I am forced to pay about £60 (or more) per hour for a similar semi skilled individual.
As woodworkers, most of us don't charge enough!

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Re: Sliding sash repairs

Post by Meccarroll » Thu Oct 29, 2020 6:34 pm

Mike Jordan wrote:
Sat Oct 24, 2020 8:56 am
Without wishing to be offensive in any way, I feel that you are not benefiting yourself or the status of the trade by not refusing to spend time on this type of work. As you point out there are few good craftsmen about. Those semi skilled people you mention are probably charging an hourly rate higher than yours and leaving the skilled work alone.
My approach in the past was to draw the line at any window where the rot extended to the pully stiles, there is always other work to be had which beats raking out rot.
If I take my car for a service I am forced to pay about £60 (or more) per hour for a similar semi skilled individual.
As woodworkers, most of us don't charge enough!
Hi Mike, the work was for a customer who has waited about two years for me to do it and I picked a time when I was not busy so although it was not as profitable as I'd have liked it still gave me some income. I now have some more work from the same customer to do on a day rate so not all bad.

Thank you for the comments Mike and I'm not offended in the slightest.

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