Veritas beading tool

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Veritas beading tool

Postby paulchapman » Sun Mar 15, 2009 3:14 pm

Martin Brown of BriMarc kindly sent me, on loan, the recently introduced Veritas Beading Tool to have a play with. Here are my impressions.

This is the tool as supplied

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It comes with one single-point cutter and 5 blank cutters which the user can shape. As these can be shaped both ends, there are potentially 12 cutters as standard. Additional beading, fluting and reeding cutters are available as extras.

These are the component parts of the tool

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As with all Veritas tools, it is very well made and finished. The handles are Bubinga - the knob-shaped one pivots from horizontal to vertical.

The fence is innovative in that it can be secured in three positions - for straight, curved or bullnose work

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Then there are two options for each position by flipping the fence over, depending on whether you want to work right or left-handed.

The blade is secured by a clamp and can be slid along the length of the sole

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Beading tools (or scratchstocks as they are sometimes known) come in a variety of shapes, sizes and designs and many are shop-made. Here's a very basic one made from plywood

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And here's one, made from brass, which Pete (Newt) very kindly made for me

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So I think it's fair to say that there isn't a "standard" style of beading tool. When I first saw the Veritas, I thought it looked a bit odd because of the handles but in use I found it very comfortable. I found this the best way to hold it

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Two thumbs behind the cutter and one finger pressing against the fence.

The comprehensive instruction sheet gave no information about direction of cut, but a one page leaflet packed with the tool said that it should be used on the pull stroke rather than the push stroke. However, I instinctitively wanted to push it and found that it worked perfectly well that way. The only difficulty I found was with the fence which projects only one side of the body, which results in little contact with the workpiece at the end of the stroke

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I did a comparison with my brass scratchstock where the fence projects both sides of the sole

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I found this better. However, with a little care, both produced identical results, so it's not a big problem

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I had a piece of oak left over from a 3' diameter table-top which I'd cut out, so tried the curved fence on this. Although it was fairly coarse wood and not ideal for beading, the curved fence worked well and the tool cut nicely

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Overall, I'd rate this as a very nice tool which works well. The most innovative part of it is the fence which will enable you to use the tool on virtually any type of beading work. However, I just wish it projected both sides of the sole.

Cheers ;)

Paul
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby engineerone » Sun Mar 15, 2009 4:39 pm

nice report paul, and as usual the brass knobs and knockers do seem to work :lol:

paul ;)
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby mrgrimsdale » Tue Mar 17, 2009 8:54 am

Beading tools (or scratchstocks as they are sometimes known) come in a variety of shapes, sizes and designs
They don't come at all! They are just about the simplest tool to make for yourself. You don't buy them!
NB they are only for quickly bodged mouldings on cheap work. Better is a moulding plane for straight work or a planted on cockbead thing for curved work.
Another toolie extravaganza!
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby paulchapman » Tue Mar 17, 2009 9:35 am

mrgrimsdale wrote:NB they are only for quickly bodged mouldings on cheap work.


Rubbish :lol:

Cheers ;)

Paul
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby colincott » Tue Mar 17, 2009 9:38 am

paulchapman wrote:
mrgrimsdale wrote:NB they are only for quickly bodged mouldings on cheap work.


Rubbish :lol:

Cheers ;)

Paul


I agree Paul as I have used one for years to copy mouldings on Antiques that I have repaired, plus they have to be used for mouldings that are cross grained as moulding planes dont work so well on them :)
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby thebloke » Tue Mar 17, 2009 9:42 am

paulchapman wrote:
mrgrimsdale wrote:NB they are only for quickly bodged mouldings on cheap work.


Rubbish :lol:

Cheers ;)

Paul

Agree with Paul...absolute bloody tosh! - Rob
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby paulchapman » Tue Mar 17, 2009 9:47 am

Three against one - we're winning :lol: :lol:
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby thebloke » Tue Mar 17, 2009 9:57 am

paulchapman wrote:Three against one - we're winning :lol: :lol:

Paul - we all know from long and bitter experience that it won't make any difference in the slightest, we've got more chance of convincing Jacob that black is the new white :? - Rob
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby mrgrimsdale » Tue Mar 17, 2009 9:59 am

They are always made for the purpose, never (or hardly ever) bought, which is what I'm saying.
OK yes they are more useful than for just cheap decorative detail - stopped mouldings etc. And yes for copying a moulding for restoration. But that's the whole point - you can make one easily to match something for which you can't buy an equivalent.
If you buy the Veritas one you still have to make the profile - you might as well go the extra inch and make the whole thing!

PS Interesting to google it. Bugbear's page says it all I think.
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby thebloke » Tue Mar 17, 2009 10:24 am

The clever thing about the Veritas tool Jacob, which you've clearly failed to grasp is that it will go round corners, or even a compound curve. For straight stuff, a traditional scrach stock (and Paul and I are fortunate to own what's probably the Rolls Royce of SS's) is best, but it won't go round corners. Any mod that you do to a home made one simple won't cope adequately with a curve or worse, a compound curve of different radii...the LV Beading Tool will!! I've got one and did a review in F&C (not that you'd ever read it, let alone fork out some shekles :lol: for a copy) and I agree with Paul's summation, but before you sound off again, you need to experience one to have some basis for a discussion. It's called 'singing from the same hymn sheet' ;) - Rob
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby paulchapman » Tue Mar 17, 2009 10:55 am

thebloke wrote: Paul and I are fortunate to own what's probably the Rolls Royce of SS's


And it's brass 8-) 8-)

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Cheers :lol:

Paul
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby mrgrimsdale » Tue Mar 17, 2009 11:03 am

thebloke wrote:.....For straight stuff, a traditional scrach stock (and Paul and I are fortunate to own what's probably the Rolls Royce of SS's) is best, but it won't go round corners. Any mod that you do to a home made one simple won't cope adequately with a curve ....
Err - yes it will, why are you saying that? I've used a homemade scratch stock to do much the same as Paul is doing in his picture. That's one of the main points of using a scratch stock - it'll go where a straight moulding plane won't. Don't know why you can't do it with that brass one - maybe it's the straight fence - entirely defeats the object! Brass alone does not make a good design. :lol: Mine had no fence.
Not that it's something I do very often - in fact it was years ago.
I'll have another go to remind myself if I can spare a few minutes and find it.
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby dunbarhamlin » Tue Mar 17, 2009 11:45 am

:D Scratch stocks are great tools, but I do think MrG's horror is justified wrt both of LV's scratch stocks and their chair devils (though have to admit there just might be a chair devil mixed in with my spokeshaves :oops: )

They're very pretty tools but ridiculously easy to make. Crikey, Rob and Paul, you both make super marking gauges which require far greater time and precision than a lowly* scratch.

(* not applicable to that lovely bit o' brass of course)
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby paulchapman » Tue Mar 17, 2009 12:18 pm

You're absolutely right, Steve, there's no need to ever buy a scratchstock (or a marking gauge ;) ) and they are easy to make - even Rob Lee of Veritas has acknowledged this. Nevertheless, some people have no interest in making their own tools and would rather buy, so there is a market out there for such basic tools. For those people it's good that manufacturers like Veritas are satisfying that market with good quality tools that work well.

It also satisfies Jacob's need to have a daily moan......... :lol:

Cheers ;)

Paul
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby thebloke » Tue Mar 17, 2009 12:49 pm

mrgrimsdale wrote:
thebloke wrote:.....For straight stuff, a traditional scrach stock (and Paul and I are fortunate to own what's probably the Rolls Royce of SS's) is best, but it won't go round corners. Any mod that you do to a home made one simple won't cope adequately with a curve ....
Err - yes it will, why are you saying that? I've used a homemade scratch stock to do much the same as Paul is doing in his picture. That's one of the main points of using a scratch stock - it'll go where a straight moulding plane won't. Don't why you can't do it with that brass one - maybe it's the straight fence - entirely defeats the object! Brass alone does not make a good design. :lol: Mine had no fence.
Not that it's something I do very often - in fact it was years ago.
I'll have another go to remind myself if I can spare a few minutes and find it.

Jacob - I made a traditional wooden scratch stock (and was first shown how to use one in the 70's by someone I knew who won a Gold Medal from the Worshipful Company of Carpenters) years ago and they are OK. Let's say you make one from two bits of 12mm stuff (that's 1/2" :) ) that means you have 25mm (that's an inch, roughly) in contact with the side of the timber, which is OK for staight stuff...with care! When you try and go round concave bend, just the two outside corners of the SS will touch the work, but the distance from the cutter to the edge of the board will decrease fractionally. If a convex curve is moulded, you then are working on a single point of contact on the SS which makes it almost impossible to do well as it becomes bloody difficult to control the tool effectivly...that's why they're not used on curved work that needs any precision . The LV Beading Tool gets round all these problems 'cos of the ingeniously designed fence.
Having tried to explain it to you, I can feel in me bones that it's a complete waste of time...but it's also got brass knobs on which makes it even better :lol: - Rob
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby mrgrimsdale » Tue Mar 17, 2009 1:19 pm

If a convex curve is moulded, you then are working on a single point of contact on the SS which makes it almost impossible to do well as it becomes bloody difficult to control the tool effectivly..
Mine (can't find it) was about 1/2" with the cutter in a saw kerf, tightened with a nut and bolt. The inside edge of the L was pointed. It worked OK inside and out of curves. Commonplace little DIY gadget. Surprised you couldn't do it. Your brass one could be modified. It's not a very good design.
It's the old prob; toolies start with low expectations which are self fulfilling and they give up too soon (and anyway they just lurve their catalogues :lol: )

PS I was writing the above and had a touch of deja-vu; using a ring fence on a spindle is vaguely similar, a single point of contact yet a smooth curve.
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby jake » Tue Mar 17, 2009 1:25 pm

thebloke wrote: ...that's why they're not used on curved work that needs any precision . The LV Beading Tool gets round all these problems 'cos of the ingeniously designed fence.


Are you really saying that hitherto, and prior to the release of this tool, it has been impossible to do beading/mouldings with any precision on curved work? It sounds a bit like it, but that sounds like an overstatement of the case. I can understand it being an easier-to-use tool which can obviate some of the skill needed to use a cruder tool*. But I suspect it would be rude to many generations of craftsmen (and Colin, above, for example) to say that their work lacked precision.

(*and there's nothing wrong with that from my point of view - as a lazy amateur with little time and a little more money, I'm happy to pay for such luxuries)
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby paulchapman » Tue Mar 17, 2009 1:36 pm

jake wrote:
thebloke wrote: ...that's why they're not used on curved work that needs any precision . The LV Beading Tool gets round all these problems 'cos of the ingeniously designed fence.


Are you really saying that hitherto, and prior to the release of this tool, precision curved beading/mouldings has been impossible?


I think Rob was making the point that for precision curved work, a fence with a single point of contact makes the work difficult. There are other scratchstocks (both shop made and commercially made) that have suitable fences.

Cheers ;)

Paul
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby jake » Tue Mar 17, 2009 2:02 pm

paulchapman wrote:I think Rob was making the point that for precision curved work, a fence with a single point of contact makes the work difficult. There are other scratchstocks (both shop made and commercially made) that have suitable fences.


Maybe. He didn't say "difficult" though, he said that they simply weren't used for precision work. Saying it is difficult isn't much different from Grim's position, which seems to me to be that these things are really a substitute for skill.

I don't mind that myself, as my skills are low compared to either of them, and I'll take the advantage that a more expensive tool may bring me!

However, I suspect the real truth is that this was more of a snobby dig at Grim's joinery background than anything more.
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby thebloke » Tue Mar 17, 2009 2:15 pm

paulchapman wrote:
jake wrote:
thebloke wrote: ...that's why they're not used on curved work that needs any precision . The LV Beading Tool gets round all these problems 'cos of the ingeniously designed fence.


Are you really saying that hitherto, and prior to the release of this tool, precision curved beading/mouldings has been impossible?


I think Rob was making the point that for precision curved work, a fence with a single point of contact makes the work difficult. There are other scratchstocks (both shop made and commercially made) that have suitable fences.

Cheers ;)

Paul

Thanks Paul, that was the point I was trying to make...semantics again. A single poc will allow the tool to pivot around that point in an arc which would make it very difficult to maintain a constant distance from the edge.
Jake - not having a go at Jacob at all...but sometimes you do need a 'sledgehammer to crack a nut' - Rob
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby paulchapman » Tue Mar 17, 2009 2:18 pm

jake wrote:However, I suspect the real truth is that this was more of a snobby dig at Grim's joinery background than anything more.


I didn't read it like that - and knowing Rob well, I wouldn't describe him as a snob. Anyway, both Rob and I were only trying to be helpful so why not just take our comments in the spirit they were intended and leave Jacob to struggle along in the dark ages........

Cheers ;)

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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby mrgrimsdale » Tue Mar 17, 2009 2:20 pm

A single poc will allow the tool to pivot around that point in an arc which would make it very difficult to maintain a constant distance from the edge.

Your work has pox?
So that's the excuse. :lol: :lol:
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby thebloke » Tue Mar 17, 2009 4:26 pm

mrgrimsdale wrote:
A single poc will allow the tool to pivot around that point in an arc which would make it very difficult to maintain a constant distance from the edge.

Your work has pox?
So that's the excuse. :lol: :lol:


Jacob - I work for the MOD and the military do just lurve their acronyms so:
POC - point of contact
BUPOC - business user point of contact
JSP - joint services publication
JCUFI - joint communications unit Falkland Islands
....ad infinitum for page after page ;) - Rob
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby mrgrimsdale » Sun Mar 22, 2009 9:45 am

Found my scratch stock. Haven't used it for years. Looks a bit pathetic. Still works OK though, and goes around curves no prob. Would work even better if I sharpened it. It works both ways so you push or pull around curves to go downhill on the grain.
At first the cut looks messy but as it settles in to it's groove it gets smoother.

Image
Image
Image
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby mrgrimsdale » Mon Mar 23, 2009 1:14 pm

paulchapman wrote:
thebloke wrote: Paul and I are fortunate to own what's probably the Rolls Royce of SS's


And it's brass 8-) 8-)

Image

Cheers :lol:

Paul

Nicely made but not sure abt the design. It's too short overall so you won't get a good steady two handed grip. It needs to be more like a spokeshave. A one handled or short handled spokeshave would be difficult. The fence is redundant - it'd work better if you turned it around 180 deg and used the other end, perhaps rounding it off a touch.*
The rounded shaft is a good idea though, for slightly more precise tilting of the scraping action. Fence doubly redundant here as if you tilt, one end comes up off the work. Scope here for a tilting fence - a good excuse for making a really simple tool really complicated. Brass knobs galore! :lol: :lol:

*PS or if you turn the fence 45 deg and use the rounded end of the T? And fastened a long handle on top of it. Might be simpler to bin it and start again.
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby bugbear » Mon Mar 23, 2009 2:01 pm

mrgrimsdale wrote:PS Interesting to google it. Bugbear's page says it all I think.


I'm off for a quiet lie down...

I've just had a terrible shock Image

BugBear
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby mrgrimsdale » Mon Mar 23, 2009 6:38 pm

bugbear wrote:
mrgrimsdale wrote:PS Interesting to google it. Bugbear's page says it all I think.


I'm off for a quiet lie down...

I've just had a terrible shock Image

BugBear

Well I might change my mind!

I didn't know abt the Stanley 66 til I saw your page. That looks like the bees knees. Pity it's not available except as the ludicrously expensive LN version.
At least LVs attempt is cheaper even if it isn't much good.
It's a good job they are so easy to make for yourself. Just a step on from the plumb bob.
Do LN/LV make plumb bobs? Not difficult - basically a brass knob on a string. :lol: :lol:
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby mrgrimsdale » Tue Mar 24, 2009 8:52 am

Just spotted a hint that the veritas beading tool could be a misfired April 1st joke.
That explains it then. :lol:
Can't think of another reason why it's only got one handle (and a knob) instead of 2 like the Stanley 66 and all home made versions (that are useable). :lol: :lol:
Hands up who bought it!

PS My bicycle has 2 handles on the handle bar. What would happen if I cut one off* and replaced it with a knob? A brass one? Hmm. It'd get through narrow gaps easier. I'll give it a go. I'm a frustrated tool designer at heart. :lol: :lol:

*Or cut them both off?
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby thebloke » Tue Mar 24, 2009 9:10 am

Jacob - as you've not used one of Pete's SS's (and are extremely unlikely ever to do so) I think it's a bit harsh to start sniping at it. Pete didn't make any charge of any sort for mine and Paul's...member's on the 'other side' though who wanted one had to pay a very hefty premium, and those that Pete did make were snapped up instantly. Everyone who's seen it, and moreover used it have been mightily impressed.
The elegance of the design is only apparant when you use it, 'especially if you try and make a groove for a line which is not close to the edge...this is why Pete developed the design 'cos he had a project that needed some SS work about 35mm away from the edge. If you try it with a standard crappy wooden affair like you've got, you'll probably have great difficulty in doing that sort of work as the tool becomes more unstable the further the groove or bead is away from the edge...it's that single poc (point of contact :lol: ) thing again where it'll tend to rotate about a single point in use unless you're extremely careful.
Short version is that Pete's SS simply doesn't...end of story - Rob
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby mrgrimsdale » Tue Mar 24, 2009 9:25 am

It just needs two handles like a spokeshave and then the single poc is not a problem. Also would give something to hold on to instead of having to nip it uncomfortably between your fingers.

a standard crappy wooden affair like you've got
Crappy it may be but it took minutes to make, cost nothing and works perfectly well.

Actually a lot (all?) of my tools would get classed as 'crappy' by the 'tool experts committee', but many of them (all?) work surprisingly well!
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby thebloke » Tue Mar 24, 2009 10:46 am

mrgrimsdale wrote:It just needs two handles like a spokeshave and then the single poc is not a problem.
a standard crappy wooden affair like you've got
Crappy it may be but it took minutes to make, cost nothing and works perfectly well.

I give up...Image Image Image - Rob
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby bugbear » Tue Mar 24, 2009 11:51 am

mrgrimsdale wrote:
bugbear wrote:
mrgrimsdale wrote:PS Interesting to google it. Bugbear's page says it all I think.


I'm off for a quiet lie down...

I've just had a terrible shock Image

BugBear

Well I might change my mind!

I didn't know abt the Stanley 66 til I saw your page. That looks like the bees knees.


Not really. It has a fatal flaw. The blade is held at a forward facing slope, which makes for a great cutting action, but means the cutting action isn't bidirectional, which prevents some of the scratch stock's better tricks.

BugBear
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby mrgrimsdale » Tue Mar 24, 2009 12:12 pm

bugbear wrote:I'm off for a quiet lie down...

I've just had a terrible shock Image

BugBear
Well I might change my mind!

I didn't know abt the Stanley 66 til I saw your page. That looks like the bees knees.

Not really. It has a fatal flaw. The blade is held at a forward facing slope, which makes for a great cutting action, but means the cutting action isn't bidirectional, which prevents some of the scratch stock's better tricks.

BugBear

Right. Point taken.
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby colincott » Tue Mar 24, 2009 3:41 pm

as someone that has used ss for years on all sorts of jobs.

I would say that the brass ss that the is a good design, as it is much easier to adjust it with that type of fence.
I have used the plain wooden ones and ended up making one myself from one seen somewhere else, that is adjustable.

Jacob
Can you tell me why you almost always see just one way of doing things?
Progress is not all bad, you use a spindle moulder and not moulding planes anymore dont you!

Having tried some of the tools you say are just to much money for what they are but I dont see it that way.

I have one of the LV block planes and was going to buy one but got one for free after testing a tool for them, it is the first one I go for now.

Would have been happy to pay for one at the time which was about $65 at the time.
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby mrgrimsdale » Tue Mar 24, 2009 5:09 pm

colincott wrote:...
Jacob
Can you tell me why you almost always see just one way of doing things?.......

It's the other way around. I'm sure most of these posh tool are OK - with one or two obvious exceptions.
What I'm saying is that the 'ordinary' tools which everybody is so critical of are not half as bad as they say. I think it's a great pity that so many people are discouraged from using them. I've been influenced too and have only recently discovered that some of my tools which I thought were rubbish for years, are in fact perfectly OK if I persist just a little in sorting them out. Nothing major, sharpening, adjusting and most of all using!
I think there are more ways of doing things than the narrow options offered by the tool brigade.
The good thing about it is that second hand prices are really low. I just bought a 'Record Marples' No4 Plane on ebay for £8! Its hardly been used and after 30 minutes fiddling it works perfectly. I expect it'll be on the toolie black list as a "crap tool, not like the pre-war..." etc etc :roll:
The LN no4 is £310. Just the stupid sock costs nearly £8 :lol: :lol: :lol: These tools are not just a bit pricier - they are very very expensive.

Possibly the worst thing about the narrow toolie way is that novices are persuaded that its the tool's fault and that they should buy the brassknob option at enormous cost, only to find that they can't get that to work too well either.

I have one of the LV block planes and was going to buy one but got one for free after testing a tool for them, it is the first one I go for now.
So you haven't bought one Colin? You must be managing like me with loadsa crap tools! You obviously haven't thought it worthwhile to fork out £310 for no4!
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby colincott » Tue Mar 24, 2009 5:31 pm

mrgrimsdale wrote:
colincott wrote:...
Jacob
Can you tell me why you almost always see just one way of doing things?.......

It's the other way around. I'm sure most of these posh tool are OK - with one or two obvious exceptions.
What I'm saying is that the 'ordinary' tools which everybody is so critical of are not half as bad as they say. I think it's a great pity that so many people are discouraged from using them. I've been influenced too and have only recently discovered that some of my tools which I thought were rubbish for years, are in fact perfectly OK if I persist just a little in sorting them out. Nothing major, sharpening, adjusting and most of all using!
I think there are more ways of doing things than the narrow options offered by the tool brigade.
The good thing about it is that second hand prices are really low. I just bought a 'Record Marples' No4 Plane on ebay for £8! Its hardly been used and after 30 minutes fiddling it works perfectly. I expect it'll be on the toolie black list as a "crap tool, not like the pre-war..." etc etc :roll: :roll:

Possibly the worst thing about the narrow toolie way is that novices are persuaded that its the tool's fault and that they should buy the brassknob option at enormous cost, only to find that they can't get that to work too well either.

I have one of the LV block planes and was going to buy one but got one for free after testing a tool for them, it is the first one I go for now.
So you haven't bought one Colin? You must be managing like me with loadsa crap tools!


I do agree with some of what you say about old tools but also understand where some of the the other are talking about as my first No4 stanley was a real pain t use, being one of the ones made a round 39-45 that had a two piece bit that went over the adjuster.

If you have used one, you will know just what a pain they are to use but most of my tools are older stanley planes or marples chisels, with a few other makers thrown in.

I have a LV block plane but most of mine are stanley ones, which I have used for years but now having the LV one dont get used much.
Not because they dont work, just that the other works so much better with what I use it for.

If you dont know what is wrong with the tool you have, which can be all sorts of things sometimes, how do you work that out, unless you have someone to show you in the first place?

I will leave it there or start a new thread as I dont want to hi jack this one any more. :?
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby mrgrimsdale » Tue Mar 24, 2009 5:42 pm

my first No4 stanley was a real pain t use, being one of the ones made a round 39-45
I'm not saying they are all OK! There are loads of duds - Patricks Blood and Gore site tells the tale.
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby colincott » Tue Mar 24, 2009 5:50 pm

Some of the tools you use are ok for soft woods but no good at all for some if the woods that I have had to use.

As one of the guys I use to work with found out and had to keep using other peoples tools, which stopped after a while :roll:
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby mrgrimsdale » Tue Mar 24, 2009 6:12 pm

colincott wrote:Some of the tools you use are ok for soft woods but no good at all for some if the woods that I have had to use.

As one of the guys I use to work with found out and had to keep using other peoples tools, which stopped after a while :roll:

Less physical work in softwoods but it's easier to get a good finish in hardwoods as a rule - with some notable exceptions on both sides.
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Re: Veritas beading tool

Postby colincott » Tue Mar 24, 2009 7:19 pm

That would very much depend on what type of hardwoods you are talking about as some can be a real pain to work like Palm for one.
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