Dewalt Mitre Saw

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Steve B
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Dewalt Mitre Saw

Post by Steve B » Thu Nov 28, 2019 12:49 pm

Hi Guys,

I am contemplating returning to site work, mainly 2nd fix and need to purchase a new chop saw...used to use the dewalt 777 size but would it be better to upgrade to the 778 250mm blade version?

Your input would be greatly appreciated.

Steve B

Meccarroll
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Re: Dewalt Mitre Saw

Post by Meccarroll » Thu Nov 28, 2019 6:18 pm

I do mostly site work first fix (roofing, studwork, restoration work etc) but also do second fix site work as well. I only tend to use a chop saw for second fix work as a skill saw seems better suited to first fix work. With this in mind I would suggest that you don't need a chop saw with a large blade for second fix work.

I had a Dewalt 777 and thought it was a very good site saw, robust and accurate but I used to get frustrated because it was not suitable for trenching. Finally my Dewalt 777 gave up and I needed to replace it so after a bit of research I purchased a Makita LS0714 Chop saw. The Makita is great for second fix work because it's light compact and easily copes with all interior work most chippies will come across. I'd recommend looking at one as they are so light and easy to walk around a site with when second fixing.

Steve B
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Re: Dewalt Mitre Saw

Post by Steve B » Thu Nov 28, 2019 10:57 pm

Meccarroll wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 6:18 pm
I do mostly site work first fix (roofing, studwork, restoration work etc) but also do second fix site work as well. I only tend to use a chop saw for second fix work as a skill saw seems better suited to first fix work. With this in mind I would suggest that you don't need a chop saw with a large blade for second fix work.

I had a Dewalt 777 and thought it was a very good site saw, robust and accurate but I used to get frustrated because it was not suitable for trenching. Finally my Dewalt 777 gave up and I needed to replace it so after a bit of research I purchased a Makita LS0714 Chop saw. The Makita is great for second fix work because it's light compact and easily copes with all interior work most chippies will come across. I'd recommend looking at one as they are so light and easy to walk around a site with when second fixing.
Thanks for your input...I guess your right about the size of the blade and yeah i generally use a skill saw with speed square for 1st fixing...and also done a bit of trenching with it last week making door linings up.
I will take a look at the makita aswell.

Steve

Meccarroll
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Re: Dewalt Mitre Saw

Post by Meccarroll » Sun Dec 01, 2019 7:51 am

Steve B wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 10:57 pm

Thanks for your input...I guess your right about the size of the blade and yeah i generally use a skill saw with speed square for 1st fixing...and also done a bit of trenching with it last week making door linings up.
I will take a look at the makita aswell.

Steve
I have never used a skill saw for trenching in door linings but it's a fair idea :idea:

When I first started in woodwork no one had power tools except the firm you worked for. Back then a firm might have one skill saw and one tar planer for the whole workforce to use, which had to be booked in advance for each job, if someone else had it you had to get the job done with hand tools. It's so easy now compared to years ago when we could spend half a day hand ripping roofing sheets before fixing them by hammer and nails. I sometimes revert back to using hand tools just to save walking the distance to pick up a chop saw or skill saw and I find it quite therapeutic at times.

Having said all that Steve, if you are looking at buying a new chop saw why not consider a cordless battery chop saw! They may be £100 more than a corded chop saw but save the hassle of transformer, leads and of course power supply. How useful they can be does depend upon where you are working but for portability they surly must come in the top bracket. Tools4Trade: https://www.tools4trade.co.uk/power-too ... eries.html are selling the DeWalt DCS365N with two 5Ah batteries for £412 inc Vat and Free Delivery, or £309 for the bare saw. NB: the advert does not say a charger is included. They also do Interest Free Finance over 6 Months if you are interested.

Mark

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Re: Dewalt Mitre Saw

Post by promhandicam » Mon Dec 02, 2019 11:22 pm

Meccarroll wrote:
Sun Dec 01, 2019 7:51 am
Steve B wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 10:57 pm

Thanks for your input...I guess your right about the size of the blade and yeah i generally use a skill saw with speed square for 1st fixing...and also done a bit of trenching with it last week making door linings up.
I will take a look at the makita aswell.

Steve
I have never used a skill saw for trenching in door linings but it's a fair idea :idea:

When I first started in woodwork no one had power tools except the firm you worked for. Back then a firm might have one skill saw and one tar planer for the whole workforce to use, which had to be booked in advance for each job, if someone else had it you had to get the job done with hand tools. It's so easy now compared to years ago when we could spend half a day hand ripping roofing sheets before fixing them by hammer and nails. I sometimes revert back to using hand tools just to save walking the distance to pick up a chop saw or skill saw and I find it quite therapeutic at times.

Having said all that Steve, if you are looking at buying a new chop saw why not consider a cordless battery chop saw! They may be £100 more than a corded chop saw but save the hassle of transformer, leads and of course power supply. How useful they can be does depend upon where you are working but for portability they surly must come in the top bracket. Tools4Trade: https://www.tools4trade.co.uk/power-too ... eries.html are selling the DeWalt DCS365N with two 5Ah batteries for £412 inc Vat and Free Delivery, or £309 for the bare saw. NB: the advert does not say a charger is included. They also do Interest Free Finance over 6 Months if you are interested.

Mark

I was talking to a builder last week who was raving about his 36v makita scms. Not used one myself, but have the cordless festool track saw which is pretty good as long as you select the correct blade ;)

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