Prepping 'heavy' boards - best practice?

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thatsnotafestool
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Prepping 'heavy' boards - best practice?

Postby thatsnotafestool » Sun Aug 05, 2018 6:44 am

As mentioned in the power feeder thread, I'm curious to know if there is a preferred way of prepping large *and heavy) boards. Say you want to get two 95 x 45mm x 2.3m out of a 9 x 2 sawn board.

Do you rip the sawn board down first. Then plane the two sides then run it through the thicknesser (and possibly a run through the table saw to remove 6mm or so to save trips through the thicknesser.

Or do you plane up the 9 x 2 first ? Then rip in two, then replane the cut edge and then run them through the thicknesser ?

TIA
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Re: Prepping 'heavy' boards - best practice?

Postby promhandicam » Sun Aug 05, 2018 11:39 pm

Rip, cross cut to rough length, face, edge then thickness.

thatsnotafestool
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Re: Prepping 'heavy' boards - best practice?

Postby thatsnotafestool » Sun Aug 19, 2018 12:15 pm

Thanks, Steve. That's what I've been doing but recently decided with the power feeder to try facing the whole board width in one pass to save time and it worked a treat.
The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time.
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Re: Prepping 'heavy' boards - best practice?

Postby Oakfield » Mon Aug 20, 2018 12:55 am

I guess the main problem that could come from doing that is if the boards were very cupped you would have to remove a lot of material to get a flat face, this might mean it ends up too thin by the time you thickness it - there’s definitely less waste by ripping and cutting to approximate size first.

thatsnotafestool
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Re: Prepping 'heavy' boards - best practice?

Postby thatsnotafestool » Mon Aug 20, 2018 9:45 pm

That's a good point...worth remembering.
The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time.
Friedrich Nietzsche

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Re: Prepping 'heavy' boards - best practice?

Postby Meccarroll » Sat Aug 25, 2018 2:04 pm

I normally face one side and one edge first then rip down the centre leaving enough the re-face if necessary.

I find facing one edge and and face first makes controlling the cut easier and more accurate. After I have cut the boards I leave them to stand for about three days to allow any movement to take place before facing all the edges. Sometimes, after sawing, a piece will distort too much for use but I'll allow for this when purchasing the timber and purposely cut two or three pieces more than I need to allow for any replacement.


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