Outdoor table in reclaimed Sapele

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modernist
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Outdoor table in reclaimed Sapele

Postby modernist » Wed Jun 12, 2013 3:57 pm

Can't be ars'd to write it all again so full story on the blog.

Image
Cheers

Brian


Tune in, turn on with Scandi Modern, it's fab.

Visit my blog at http://modernistmullings.blogspot.co.uk

cncpaul
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Re: Outdoor table in reclaimed Sapele

Postby cncpaul » Wed Jun 12, 2013 4:50 pm

Nice table Brian, you have turned a pile of crap into a very respectable table .

Reading your blog I noticed you mention of Ron Carter, he was a really nice guy and a superb designer, I made the Miles Carter prototypes before I joined them as production manager in Wirksworth.
Paul

If you only have a hammer then everything looks like a nail

http://www.fretworks.co.uk/. 2D & 3D CNC Router - Laser cutting and engraving.

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Re: Outdoor table in reclaimed Sapele

Postby andrewking » Wed Jun 12, 2013 4:56 pm

Nice! I like the little upturn detail in the rail that is replicated in the top end slats, very effective.

Andy

modernist
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Re: Outdoor table in reclaimed Sapele

Postby modernist » Wed Jun 12, 2013 6:22 pm

Thanks both, I didn't know you hailed from Wirksworth Paul!

I like to think some of the things I have seen on the Scandi stuff are emerging Andy (but I might be wrong) :-)
Cheers

Brian


Tune in, turn on with Scandi Modern, it's fab.

Visit my blog at http://modernistmullings.blogspot.co.uk

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Re: Outdoor table in reclaimed Sapele

Postby sgiandubh » Wed Jun 12, 2013 9:39 pm

It's a nice little table there Brian. Understated and clean, and I like the way the eye is deceived somewhat by some of the curves. What I mean is that, looking at the final photograph in your blog for instance, the stretchers seem to curve inwards, as if following the curve of the slatted top, whereas I'm pretty sure they only curve upwards. Whether it was intended or not, it's something that catches my eye and is visually appealing.

I found your comment about cleaning off dried polyurethane glue interesting because I've generally found it one of the easiest glues to remove, not troublesome. I seldom use polyurethane glue for indoor furniture because I've found it more likely to fail than other glues. But for wet or air dried wood that's going to go outside as a finished artefact (furniture or whatever) it's just about the only glue that will stick together joints made out of wood that's more than 20% MC. Just about every other glue is designed for use on dry wood, which of course, by definition, means wood that's below 20% MC. Slainte.

PS. Thanks for the kind words in my tambour making thread. I guess you were happy to see a piece of mine that didn't have the much derided "carthorse" legs on it, but I still like them and may well use them again, ha, ha.

modernist
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Re: Outdoor table in reclaimed Sapele

Postby modernist » Wed Jun 12, 2013 10:57 pm

sgiandubh wrote:It's a nice little table there Brian. Understated and clean, and I like the way the eye is deceived somewhat by some of the curves. What I mean is that, looking at the final photograph in your blog for instance, the stretchers seem to curve inwards, as if following the curve of the slatted top, whereas I'm pretty sure they only curve upwards. Whether it was intended or not, it's something that catches my eye and is visually appealing.

I found your comment about cleaning off dried polyurethane glue interesting because I've generally found it one of the easiest glues to remove, not troublesome. I seldom use polyurethane glue for indoor furniture because I've found it more likely to fail than other glues. But for wet or air dried wood that's going to go outside as a finished artefact (furniture or whatever) it's just about the only glue that will stick together joints made out of wood that's more than 20% MC. Just about every other glue is designed for use on dry wood, which of course, by definition, means wood that's below 20% MC. Slainte.

PS. Thanks for the kind words in my tambour making thread. I guess you were happy to see a piece of mine that didn't have the much derided "carthorse" legs on it, but I still like them and may well use them again, ha, ha.


They do only curve upwards, the idea was probably a relic of some scandi modern design book but I thought it would be a good idea if the rails left the legs at right angles.

Re the glue, maybe I should buy a bottle of acetone. It certainly seems to stick OK.

Re the tambour cupboard, I confess it did cross my mind, but I love the rainbow front; stunning.
Cheers

Brian


Tune in, turn on with Scandi Modern, it's fab.

Visit my blog at http://modernistmullings.blogspot.co.uk

mark270981
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Re: Outdoor table in reclaimed Sapele

Postby mark270981 » Thu Jun 13, 2013 6:12 am

Lovely piece of furniture - your blog is also very good.

And welcome back
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ALOTBSOL

Mark - Sutton Coldfield


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