Set of circular segmental steps - FINISHED

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Set of circular segmental steps - FINISHED

Post by thatsnotafestool » Fri Dec 20, 2019 3:02 pm

To go in here ...(original thoughts but read on for the current plan!)

I'm making up this pair of steps to manage the transition in level between two floor levels thus.
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Please note...that ghastly colour of the floorboards is not like that in real life !

This was my original design but veto'd by CD (Chief Designer)
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and now the idea is to continue the new floorboards on the higher level continuing through and into the top step as here
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NB The floorboards won't be all cutoff in a straight line at the RH side....

I like the idea of that transitional semi-circle to indicate or draw attention to the edge of the step. I planned to have a half-round oak bead then applied on the outer face. All repeated on the lower step. Radii of steps being 550mm and 850mm. Pretty sure that beading off-the-peg could be bent round to fit those radii without too much bother.

I got a quote for steam-bending which was eye-watering.

But I'm coming round to thinking that beading will look too 'skinny' and that I should have a bullnose moulding instead.

But here's the rub. The overhang of the bullnose doesn't want to be that great otherwise fixing it solidly becomes problematic IMO as there will be leverage from bodyweight. But if I make it too small then I'm struggling to see how I'd make it up (segmented obviously but in as large size segments as I can manage to minimise seeing the breaks ...ideally it would be one single piece. I do have a quote for it to be steam bent but it's a bit eye-watering.

I can mould the half -round using either the spindle moulder or a template trim router bit and a suitable template affixed. But then how do I achieve a smooth curve on the inside radius.....unless the front-to-back width of the bullnose is several cm to give me some sort of flat area to fix down.

But if I make that too large then that transitional half-circle mentioned above gets pushed back inwards towards the centre of the step which then upsets the aesthetics IMO.
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Fri Dec 20, 2019 3:03 pm

But...we have a plan.

This is the final design.

Image
The nosing (or edge moulding) …the one thing that was causing me grief …has been resolved by making it from coopered segments. It will be 40mm deep (ignore that extra line on the image that makes it look like a planted on half round)

The steps are NOT semi-circles but circular segments - as proposed by MikeG and they do look much better than semi-circles. I’ve done very little curved work especially on this scale and so decided to breakdown the steps into the individual components and consider :

if there were any critical relationships with adjacent parts
how easy or even how to make them
fixing them
any requirements for strength

1) subframe. 18mm ply. This will be from two segments per step and separated by verticals using pocket screws and glue.

SketchUp is your friend and allows me to mark out where I need to make the cuts to get the required pieces and squeeze it all out from just two boards of 18mm ply.

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2) veneered ‘transition’ marker. This is the one critical piece as both the outer nosing (3) and floorboards (4) can be more easily tweaked to fit. (It says here ‘in theory’ !). I have made two templates (one per step) but will keep them stable by leaving them attached to the ‘motherboard’.

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The ply + veneer thickness is slightly under that required to match the thickness of the floorboards and so I’ll be using some more constructional veneer on the other side to get the required thickness.

Fitting this to the subframe will be glue and small dominos.

3) nosing (moulding) - solid oak. I have a template made up from ply for the whole piece but don’t have the width of oak to do it in one piece. So it will need to be coopered. I can use a bearing guided router trimmer and the template. Only concern is safely handling pieces past the router bit. Needs more thought.

Here I’ve started to cut the template for the nosing using a long trammel and router. In hindsight completely cutting out the template for this wasn’t a good idea as there was a little springback…even though it’s a manmade board.

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I also decided, after advice from Steve Maskery, to only partially cut through with the router cutter (because you need to make many, many shallow cuts) then rough cut the remainder with a jigsaw and then use a bearing guided trimmer to make good using the profile cut with the router bit as the guide. Certainly speeded things up.

4) risers. The benefit of making a subframe is that I don’t need to do anything clever …such as laminating the riser. I can veneer onto 6mm MDF and fit it to the fronts of the subframe. Concerns are veneering it with the correct bend and maintaining that bend while I fit it.

But we're getting there ....

Image
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by Meccarroll » Sat Dec 21, 2019 1:36 pm

thatsnotafestool wrote:
Fri Dec 20, 2019 3:03 pm


I also decided, after advice from Steve Maskery, to only partially cut through with the router cutter (because you need to make many, many shallow cuts) then rough cut the remainder with a jigsaw and then use a bearing guided trimmer to make good using the profile cut with the router bit as the guide. Certainly speeded things up.

Roger are you suggesting that you only cut partially through the ply with the router when making the template, then finished off with a jigsaw etc?

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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Sat Dec 21, 2019 2:35 pm

Cut partially through the ply with the router on the long trammel.

Rough cut the remainder with a jigsaw taking care to leave a mm or so oversize

Run it through a bearing guided trimmer on the router table using the router cut edge as the reference.
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by Meccarroll » Sat Dec 21, 2019 6:47 pm

thatsnotafestool wrote:
Sat Dec 21, 2019 2:35 pm
Cut partially through the ply with the router on the long trammel.

Rough cut the remainder with a jigsaw taking care to leave a mm or so oversize

Run it through a bearing guided trimmer on the router table using the router cut edge as the reference.
I'm not quite sure why you think using a jigsaw and then router and bearing guide (run on a previously routed radius) is necessary?

All my templates are run straight from a router fixed to a trammel. I use a sacrificial board under the template so I can cut right through the template when I make my last cut. I leave some material at the ends so the template to hold the template in place while a use the router. Regarding flex I have found so long as the template is made from around 20mm material all works well.

Hope I'm not treading where I should not! It's a nice thread Roger and one we have needed on here for a while. Keep it up!

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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Sat Dec 21, 2019 9:53 pm

No worries at all, Mark. I appreciate your input. You're probably right TBH. The first curves I made I did exactly as you...just that I kept taking small cuts at a time. I did go all the way through the first few but it took a while. Probably six of one and half a dozen of the other TBH by the time I'd faffed about with the jigsaw etc..
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by woodsmith » Sun Dec 22, 2019 8:36 am

Have you thought about laminating the bullnose? It's quick and relatively easy to do and, if you cut the laminates from a single piece of stock, you can make it so the joints are more or less invisible.
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Sun Dec 22, 2019 10:25 am

I've never had much success with laminations in the past. Are talking about orienting the laminates vertical or horizontal ? Whichever way, I do still foresee a difficulty in moulding the bullnose in one coherent sweep and certainly when one gets closer to the walls on either side, there won't be room for the router. I do have a template for the bullnose and so running the various segments past a bearing guided trimmer on the router table prior to fitting seems the best option. Followed by some judicious sanding.

I have to keep reminding myself.....This is NOT furniture. This is NOT furniture.
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by woodsmith » Mon Dec 23, 2019 8:51 am

I'd find a straight grained length of oak at least 25mm wider than the final moulding width. Rip about a 15mm width off it, plane to 12mm and see if it will bend round the shape you need. Thickness it until it does bend happily then screw it in place. You now have the thickness you need so rip the rest of the oak down to width leaving enough to plane it smooth and screw and glue each subsequent lamination in place until you get to the final one which will needed careful gluing and clamping. When it's all set, smooth off the top level with the floor and then use the a bearing guided rounding over bit to create the bullnose as far as you can. For the ends you can then just use a sander to round over the edge. Quick and easy to do with a perfect finish :D
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Mon Dec 23, 2019 9:58 am

Do you mean like one of these ? Or neither ? I see difficulties with both (A) and (B)
keith's moulding.jpg
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by woodsmith » Mon Dec 23, 2019 2:22 pm

I thought this is what you wanted to achieve?
IMG_1070.JPG
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Mon Dec 23, 2019 3:47 pm

Not quite. This is what I am making.
keith's moulding  2.jpg
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by woodsmith » Mon Dec 23, 2019 5:19 pm

Your plan looks like a lot of hard work to get right and I would be concerned that over time a gap is likely to open up between the bullnose and the veneered transition marker. Your scheme is akin to the nosing at the top of a flight of stairs and it's rare to find one that doesn't rock!
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Tue Dec 24, 2019 9:04 am

I like a challenge !
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Fri Dec 27, 2019 5:17 pm

Managed to get out into the workshop today to veneer the arc for the bottom step in the vacuum press. Not used it since we moved three years ago. Ran it up and it seemed to suck OK. Veneer pieces all cut. A nice bit of veneer for the top and some constructional veneer for underneath to bring the overall thickness to that of the floorboards that will be inset. Bought a sheet from Capital Crispin at an astronomical price TBH and glad it's underneath as there's virtually no 'figuring' of any description. Maybe I'll try Mundy's next time.

First time veneering something as thin and curvy...bit of a 'mares TBH. Stuck it in the bag and turned the pump on and waited. And waited. And waited. Air was going out but not very fast. Cranked it up (or so I thought) but after 15 minutes I could see that it wasn't going to do the biz anytime soon and so I invoked MPM (Mad Panic Mode) .

Image

We shall see tomorrow.

In the meantime I investigated the pump and discovered that numbnuts here had misunderstood the scale and had tweaked down to minimum suck. So with a bit of luck it will be OK for the other stuff. Nonetheless I will try and do a trial run before committing.
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Sat Dec 28, 2019 8:05 am

And slightly out of sequence ...

This project is definitely something you wouldn't want to tackle as a paid job. Way too many if's and but's and 'How the hell am I going to do this?'. A lot of interdependencies affecting the sequence and timing of the work.

First off is getting the sub-frame sorted. Starts of with the bottom piece fixed in position. A simple job until you find that in the time-honoured tradition of the builder who resurrected our wreck back in 1975 for the then-owner, his refusal to ever use a spirit level continued.

So that bottom piece has to be wedged, glued and screwed in place to level it up.

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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Tue Dec 31, 2019 2:55 pm

'Compulsory' holiday got in the way of much progress :evil:

But tolerably pleased with the veneer after the earlier panic. Obviously still some finessing to do.

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Attention now turning to making the vertical veneered curved panels. I think the two 'critical' points for fixing are at the extremes. As per this diagram -

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Proposing to have blocks glued and screwed at each end and also others distributed around the periphery. The blocks will be then screwed into large pieces of timber (fitted radially) that are themselves fixed to the bottom baseboard. The edge of the bottom baseboard will be glued to the bottom of the vertical panel. The blocks at the extreme ends will be double the height that's needed thus allowing me to screw a long batten across the chord to keep the vertical panels curved and in place while everything (glue etc) goes off.

Once the vertical panel has been fixed to the bottom baseboard but before it's all set, glue the edge of the top baseboard and push that into position to give as tight a fit as I can manage to the top of the vertical panel.

So basically that vertical panel is glued all the way round at the top and bottom. Plus intermediate blocks screwed to it prior to veneering that are fixed to the radials. My one concern though is this. Seems to me that most of the stress is at the two extremities by the wall. Just glueing blocks won't work as the MDF will delaminate I think and spring back hence small screws through the MDF into those blocks prior to veneering. Just wondering about them pulling through the MDF.

I've put the MDF (6mm) in tension around a former to encourage it to stay bent. Don't think I can wet it 'cos it's MDF.

Image

Any thoughts ?
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by will1983 » Mon Jan 06, 2020 3:01 pm

Interesting project with some good challenging problems to overcome.

If the 6mm MDF piece doesn't want to stay bent or stay where you want it to go have a look at laminating a pair of 4mm strips together instead.
Also could you affix some curved doublers to your top and bottom boards to give you some more glue/nail surface area?
Check out my Instagram account cheshire_cats_workshop for more stuff I have been working on.
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Mon Jan 06, 2020 3:45 pm

I’ve had two suggestions for ‘easing’ the curve on the 6mm MDF risers : cutting a load of kerfs (RogerM TWH2) and using a hot air gun (ProfChris UKW). Since it’s over 2m long, the thought of cutting all those kerfs didn’t appeal and so I gave the hot air gun a go and it worked a treat. You have to be careful not to get too close to any strapping

Image

The allen key underneath is to spread the strap load evenly over the width. I’d noticed that without it, the MDF was starting to distort under the pressure of the strap.

Still thinking about (a) how to fix the riser to the subframe and (b) keeping it bent between taking it out of the vacuum press and fixing it to the subframe.

The solution to (a) is several blocks glued and screwed to the riser ahead of the veneering..since I don’t really want screw heads in the veneer !!
Image
In an ideal world with a level floor I might have considered making the bottom step as a unit, gluing and screwing the riser on and then veneering but, as mentioned earlier, the floor isn’t level and I would like a nice tight fit down to the floor with the riser so it’s going to be …(a) fit the bottom subframe to the floor (b) veneer (c) fit the riser to the subframe.

The solution to (b) is to have the two blocks at the lefthand and righthand extremes (where the riser meets the wall) extra tall and then have a plywood bar between the two. Using two screws at each end minimises any tendency for the riser to skew. Thus …

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This was Plan A. It lasted two whole days.

Remember I’d not done any veneering for over two years and had forgotten what little I knew. First thing was to check the pump was OK and that this time I’d set the ‘suck’ to the right level. It’s also a damn great bag. Test 1…put the riser in the bag but without veneer or glue, started the suck

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Not much happened. Then … I found out that it also helps to actually fit the vacuum connector on properly. :oops:

Test 2…well on the way. Success. Image

What next ? I remembered some of that breather membrane needs to go in but I couldn’t remember where it should go …alongside the workpiece ? On top of the veneer ? Did I have to moisten the veneer ? Did some reading around, spoke to a few folk. Membrane goes on top of the caul. Caul ? So thought to use some 6mm MDF as a caul. But speaking to Steve Maskery, he rightly pointed out ‘Why fight 6mm MDF…why not get some 3mm hardboard or picture backing board ?’. He was bang on the money.

Did you know that you can roll up 3mm hardboard and stick it in the back of your car ? No, I didn’t either until yesterday.

Then the thought struck me…looking at that photo…I couldn’t see how it was going to work properly. Surely the underside of the riser needs a better support. Or does the vacuum ‘wrap-around’ as it were and provide equal pressure on the underside? Would it all twist and stretch out of recognition once I’d fully applied the vacuum ?

More Googling…more looking at Youtube. Couldn’t find anyone daft enough to be attempting what I was doing but gut feel suggested that belt and braces dictated a decent support underneath. So unscrew the bottom panel of the subframe from the floor, take that and the upper subframe panel back into the workshop. Screw the riser using those blocks onto the bottom panel …fudge fixing the upper panel fitting all together into some semblance of a support et voila.

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Turn on the vacuum pump.

I’d knocked off as many sharp corners as I could and added padding as I didn’t want to tear the bag.

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Even then, I think I could have provided more padding.

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Doing this has also highlighted one thing…namely that glueing the top of the riser to the upper subframe panel is going to be challenging given the gaps…they will pull in but how ?

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I have a cunning plan but that will have to wait.

Oh yes…that scream you heard this afternoon? That was me realising I’d been a muppet because when I went to apply the veneer to the freshly glued surface, it was then that this eejit had cut it 3” too short. That’s something else to sort out. But we are making progress.
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Mon Jan 06, 2020 3:46 pm

will1983 wrote:
Mon Jan 06, 2020 3:01 pm
Interesting project with some good challenging problems to overcome.

If the 6mm MDF piece doesn't want to stay bent or stay where you want it to go have a look at laminating a pair of 4mm strips together instead.
Also could you affix some curved doublers to your top and bottom boards to give you some more glue/nail surface area?
Thanks for the interest and suggestions, Will.
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Tue Jan 07, 2020 9:34 am

Looking good :)

Image
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Fri Jan 10, 2020 5:01 pm

Thursday

I was planning to work on the riser readying it for finishing but discovered that the veneer had lifted up slightly and buckled right at the far end and so that needed fixing but no further work due to glue setting. This is the main niggle of this project...too many dependencies, waiting for stuff to dry plus limited assembly/working space in the workshop.

So decided to make up the two outer edge 'mouldings' (for want of a better word.....nosings ?). Decided not to cooper excessively since I had a reasonably wide piece of oak that I could use to make 60-75% of the nosing in one piece. Then it was just a case marking out the remaining pieces, cutting them on the mitresaw, finessing them with the disc sander, using a 4mm domino at each joint and glueing them all up. I use the template as my guide as I decided to glue them all together and router trim and mould them in one go.

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I've also decided to domino/glue the veneered 'transition' marker to these mouldings first and then fix them to the subframe as a unit.

Today - Friday

Fixed the smaller nosing to its template, started running it over the bearing guided cutter and all was going very well until…..

Image

It all happened bloody fast and I still don’t know quite what caused it to happen. Just means a bit more faffing about adding and glueing a new piece (if I have enough oak left). Fortunately I still have all my fingers but I’m going to have to think of a better way of holding this.
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Mon Jan 13, 2020 6:41 pm

So here we have the larger nosing and transition piece (for the bottom step). After my little (ahem) mishap, managed to finesse routing the nosing back to the template plus rounding the corners over with a different cutter. The outside radii in the troublesome area were finished off on the linisher...a lot more gentle process than a whizzing router cutter.

I started to carry on sanding the nosing etc but felt I was playing with fire as I had been caught out with some hidden shakes in the oak and I didn't want to run the risk of it snapping. So bearing in mind my decision to pre-fit the nosing to the transition marker before fitting to the subframe now was a good time to do it.

Lots of 4mm domino's...too many in hindsight. Sealed the tops of the two pieces with Blanchon Original Wood Environment to avoid any glue filling pores etc.

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and away we go.

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A girl can never have too many clamps...
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And this turned out to be the hairiest glue-up I've ever attempted especially as there were some cockups along the way that I'm too embarrassed to admit to. :oops: But the joint looks tight and tidy-ish ...

Image
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by woodsmith » Tue Jan 14, 2020 8:45 am

You said you liked a challenge, but did you expect it to be this challenging :D
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Tue Jan 14, 2020 9:23 am

woodsmith wrote:
Tue Jan 14, 2020 8:45 am
You said you liked a challenge, but did you expect it to be this challenging :D
In a word.......No !!
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Wed Jan 15, 2020 4:37 pm

If you recall, one issue bothering me was how to secure the riser to the subframe since it couldn't be fixed prior to veneering. Idea 1 was to glue blocks to the inside face and then screw them down to the bottom subframe panel....like so..
Image

Still got the question of how to glue to the edge of the top subframe panel. And until a few days ago, the plan was to have lots of small blocks top and bottom to provide a glued fixing point between riser and panels. Then I bought that secondhand Startrite 301 and although it's scruffy and seen a lot of use, by Jove, it cuts well and for the first time, cuts don't wander, stay vertical and so problem solved.

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Bottom panel in place

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Add glue and retire.

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Someone asked about heat from the CH pipes. I'm only too aware of what that can do as shown by oak floorboards at our old place and the maple floorboards here. Apart from lagging the pipes, I'm hoping that the subframe top panel will also let any heat be spread and dissipate across the whole top rather than localised. In any event the pipes aren't that close.
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by Rogerdodge » Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:51 pm

This has been an interesting and instructive post , ( a bit like the old days.) Thanks very much for posting it.

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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:59 pm

Hey Roger...thanks for that. Good to hear from you. :)
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Thu Jan 16, 2020 12:30 pm

The good news or the bad news ?

Trimmed the riser and offered up the nosing/transition strip combi. Looks good, eh ?

Image

Um no. A very, bloody, Godawful, sit-in-a-corner hugging myself and sobbing quietly NO. I forgot to factor in the thickness of the riser. But even if I had, there is still something wrong. And I have absolutely no idea how to fix it. I can't face doing it all again. I don't have enough veneer. I don't have enough oak. To say I am totally gutted and devastated is an under-statement. :(







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promhandicam
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by promhandicam » Thu Jan 16, 2020 7:42 pm

Carpet?

thatsnotafestool
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Thu Jan 16, 2020 8:36 pm

LOL...my thoughts exactly :lol:
The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time.
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by woodsmith » Fri Jan 17, 2020 8:25 am

In theory what doesn't kill you makes you stronger, but I'm not so sure :( .
Keith

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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Thu Jan 30, 2020 2:34 pm

Now where were we ? Ah yes ...

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A suggestion by my wife prompted a bit of lateral thinking
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Turn it into a 'feature'... ;)

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Don't look too closely at the duff join in the veneer. It's not really that noticeable in the flesh. Honest.

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Well aware that the corner edge is vulnerable but can live with that.

Laid the floorboards for the bottom step in place, placed the nosing assembly on top and drew a pencil line between the two. Originally I'd planned to use the template I'd made/bodged ages ago...where we talked about bearings and offsets..but came to the conclusion that it would be better to go the pencil-round route.

The curves are cut close to the line on the bandsaw and then sanded on the linisher which makes short work provided you are careful not to go too gung-ho.

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Then it's just a simple task of finely sanding to the required shape and offering each piece up to the nosing to check for a fit. Easy-peasy :eusa-whistle: ...not. Do I do it in the house with the nosing fixed (permanently or temporarily...both have their plus and minuses) - trekking back and forth between house and workshop? Or take the nosing out to the workbench, clamp it in place and finesse the curves on the floorboards there? The latter being very handy since the linisher is only feet away. I opted for the latter.

I used the central piece of floorboard as my reference
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That piece went in very easily as did the next one a long but by the time I started on the third piece it all started getting very tricky as the individual pieces slipped and slid relative to each other. And relative to the nosing. But they all look OK-ish once in place. Eventually.

But now I’m in a quandary and a rod for my back of my own making. How the Hell do I fix them all down ?

I can glue and screw (using Tongue-Tite screws …ideal for this purpose) the nosing down first but how do I ensure that it’s in the right place relative to where the floorboards will be?

And if I do that then how do I get the floorboards into place as they are T&G

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I can’t glue them up as a unit and then drop them into place after fitting the nosing because (a) the CH pipe makes that difficult and more importantly (b) I’ve found that their position relative to the nosing is critical if gaps here and there are not to appear. They shouldn’t do because it’s a nice perfect curve…not ! Think I might have had some play in my trammel when I made the original templates.

I can’t fit the floorboards down first ahead of the nosing as then I can’t get any screws into the nosing and neither can I clamp it down while the glue sets.

Current thoughts are to remove the bottom tongue of the groove of each piece so that they can drop down onto the adjacent floorboards tongue but I do know that the floorboards are not 100% flat and so I’m going to have to glue them in place with a damn heavy weight on each to keep them flat until the glue sets ….but even then I’m concerned that the glue could fail and let them pop back up, as it were. I’m reluctant to screw them down using those plug and dowel sets as they’d be too visible.

Also I noted that the nosing moves slightly as the Tongue-Tite screws are inserted.

So the current plan is to get my mate, Richard, up. We place the floorboards in position unfixed. Apply glue where the nosing will go. Offer up the nosing to get the best tightest fit to the floorboards. Then while he holds the nosing rigidly in place, I remove the floorboards which then allows us to screw the nosing down. Then starting at one side, apply glue for the first floorboard, screw it down through its tongue using Tongue-Tite screws. Drop the next one in place and repeat the fixing…all the while making sure that they are as snug a fit as possible to the nosing.

And hopefully the last one will drop precisely into position with nary a gap. But I don’t think I have anything heavy enough to keep any bent ones down until the glues has gone off.

Straws…clutching.

Any ideas, chaps ?
The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time.
Friedrich Nietzsche

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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Thu Jan 30, 2020 4:35 pm

The answers to a couple of my concerns have been staring me in the face !

Keeping the nosing assembly in place for gluing and screwing ...sorted !

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My concern about removing part of the T&G on the floorboards ? Only necessary on the last piece :D All the rest can be 'finessed' into place without removing anything. So I can use the T&G to keep it all level and secure.
The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time.
Friedrich Nietzsche

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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Sun Feb 02, 2020 11:14 am

While the nosing is being glued down (I used a version of No-Nails as it dries slightly flexible) attention turned to the top step.

Having learned a lot from making the bottom step and being a smaller step, it went together much quicker and slicker than the bottom step.

Create the subframe with suitable cutout for the CH pipes.

Bandsaw curved blocks to support the riser.

Glue and screw all together then ..

Glue the riser in place - pre-curving it using the hot-air gun technique…brilliant tip.

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Add lots of screws to hold it down tight against the curved support blocks

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And when the glue went off, add the veneer, stick the whole lot in the vacuum press et voila

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The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time.
Friedrich Nietzsche

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Re: Set of circular segmental steps

Post by thatsnotafestool » Mon Feb 10, 2020 3:58 pm

Glueing the nosing assembly for the top step was even trickier due to the tighter radius. Dominos are NOT the right thing to use...DAMHIKT. Bit stupid of me TBH. I'd thought 'more is best' and daily cut domino slots all the way round. But they are cut along radial lines. So as you go round the curve, the axes of the dominos means that you're trying to fit the two pieces together in conflicting directions. Even with wide domino slots in one of the pieces. If my explanation isn't that good I can make a sketch. It all got a bit frantic towards the end with dominos being pulled out, cut off, shavings mixed with glue wiped off, sweat, cussing. Obvious really in hindsight. :oops:

One of those few occasions when a biscuit is the best option.

And so we're on the home straight and time for the floorboards to go on the top step. Originally I'd wanted them to follow on through in a seamless manner and segue into those that would be laid later in the hall. But then I realised that trying to manhandle and accurately sand the curves on the ends of 2.4m lengths of board just simply wasn't going to happen. So a traditional threshold strip was the way to go.

Not that many boards. I wanted to slot the two outer boards under the existing plasterboard to give me the option of not fitting any skirting board in the door opening if I or CD decided that that was the neater option. Enter the ever-brilliant Fein, slide along on top of the floorboard and trim away.

I'd thought that I'd taken a load of WIP photos but clearly didn't. My apologies. And so without further ado.

Ta da !

Finished ! (apart from making good)

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Please ignore the colorimetry. It's my camera.
The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time.
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps - FINISHED

Post by Meccarroll » Mon Feb 10, 2020 7:41 pm

Very POSH! :mrgreen:

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Re: Set of circular segmental steps - FINISHED

Post by thatsnotafestool » Tue Feb 11, 2020 4:20 pm

Thanks Mark.
The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time.
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Re: Set of circular segmental steps - FINISHED

Post by jfc » Wed Feb 12, 2020 3:27 pm

Yay ! Now just the other side of the hall to do :D

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Re: Set of circular segmental steps - FINISHED

Post by thatsnotafestool » Wed Feb 12, 2020 3:29 pm

jfc wrote:
Wed Feb 12, 2020 3:27 pm
Yay ! Now just the other side of the hall to do :D
That's the easy bit. Done in a day. :lol:
The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time.
Friedrich Nietzsche

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