Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

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modernist
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Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby modernist » Mon Dec 31, 2012 6:59 pm

Taking advantage of the week off I set about replacing the long suffering but very effective sheet of shuttering ply which has served us so well as a front door in recent years. As noted on the Christmas thread I cut the rough stock to size on Christmas morning and set about making as soon as possible after the festivities.

Just to prove I don't always shoot from the hip I thought it might be an idea to do a dimensioned sketch as Euro sections can get a bit complicated.

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I increased the size of the rebate for the lock as this is often tight and leaves fragile edges tot eh mortices. The stiles are 115 x 68, increased from 100mm to try and end up without a finger trap behind the handle as several of us have found recently. I altered the front and back ship-lap boards to 20mm to leave strong rebates as the door is exposed to extremes of weather.

This was the first "big" job on the Felder Eco 731 and you can certainly spot the Eco bit with 3 rather than 4HP motors. Nevertheless is ripped the 75mm stock OK with a sharp blade and the spindle was fine even with the Omas wobble saw. The thicknesser was a different matter and I could only take 1mm cuts of 200mm boards without stalling the knives. Felder thoughtfully provide a reversing switch for when this happens so you can wind yourself back and have another go! Having said that DF or Columbian Pine can be tough stuff.

Having machined all the stock to size I cut the boards to length and tenoned the ends using the newly purchased and eye wateringly expensive tenoning clamp. It's very nice and B well ought to be.

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Whilst the spindle was set up I rebated top and bottom edges square with a generous 15mm rebate to allow for movement.

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I was keen to test the wobble saw and machined the grooves for the board ends in the stiles at 10 x 11mm deep. There was a little breakout at the edge of one board but it was my fault as my zero clearance fence was not quite zero after I'd faffed about with positioning.

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I sorted the boards by weight keeping the heavy pieces with high resin content for the outside and the light stuff for the interior.

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It was actually at this point that I decided to go ship lap as I thought it would give better drainage and a nicer appearance

I had a new 15mm rad knife from the Finn Juhl table so used that quite effectively.

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I'd been thinking about the considerable weight of this door and it only has a single top and bottom rail with 80 x 20 haunched tenons plus stub tenons filling the board grooves and decided to house in a diagonal brace. This was a chance for a bit of hand work and I like to use these WIPs to comment on hand tools in use.

The central space in the door was 25mm to allow for insulation and I used a 25mm brace with 20mm housed tenons each end at 45 deg. (Is there a name for this joint?). I marked it out then cut sloping guide wedges to the two angles and double sided them to the stile. I cut out the bulk of the waste with the new Narex mortice chisels which, to be fair to our heavenly friend are actually very good and hold a keen edge. I then pared down both sides with paring chisels. The steep side was nor problem although the coarse grain makes it more difficult that normal. Much as I hate to say it by far the best chisel was a Jap laminated which sliced through in a vcery controllable manner and did not flex. The shallow side was a different issue and I used my Peter Sewfton purchased Sorby 10mm parer. This has a long thin dovetail blade and did not work well as the blade flexed leaving a curved base which I had to finish without the guide. I think parers do need to be stiff as, by definition you will be working a long way from the edge.

The strut was marked out and the shoulders were pretty fine at 2.5mm each side. some might think it overkill but it only took a couple of minutes to plane back to a guide using a skew block and rebate respectively for the left and right faces. I have mentioned this before but, being right handed, I find the combination of RH skew rebate and LH skew block to be idea for lots of jobs including (obviously) rebates both ways, cleaning tenon faces, chamfering end grain without break out etc etc. I use a2 in the rebate at 35deg and A1 in the block at 30 deg.

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Haunched and stub tenons were finished off ready for assembly. Although it created a lot of extra work cut a 30mm x 10mm tenon on the end of each board and a corresponding mortice in the centre of each position to keep the board gaps even when during seasonal movement. I think I could have found a quicker way to do this maybe using dominos.

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There are a total of 52 M & T's to glue up which is a bit of a nightmare on your own so I decided to glue up one side of the top and bottom rails first, along with the diagonal brace. Once this had gone off I glued all the lower mortices for the boards and knocked them in along with the insulation. This was meant to be all PU but Wickes only had Polystyrene in 25mm so I had to make do with that. I doubt if fire will attack us from the outside!

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Finally it was Sh*t or Bust time and I glued it up and went for it. I did have to reach for the lump hammer at one point but it eventually went down (what a great feeling) and I wedged it up with hardwood wedges. I used the dire Rutlands clamps which of course slide up and down perfectly until you had wet glue on hand at which point they jammed solid. Another call for the lump hammer.

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All ready for cleaning up on New Years Day. Have a good one guys.
Cheers

Brian


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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby jonnyd » Mon Dec 31, 2012 7:33 pm

The visit from the famous 4 seems to have given you a good spurt of woodworking activity it's looking good.

Cheers

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby Leveller2911 » Mon Dec 31, 2012 8:03 pm

I like the design , what will the finish be and do you treat the tongues,grooves and rebates etc before assembly?.I've haven't used Columbian Pine for years but I do like the grain.

Probably a design issue but did you consider making the bottom rail wider to help prevent the door from dropping?. I would have filled the centre core with Birch play, fairly tight to help keep the door square.

Look forward to seeing it finished ..

Happy New Year BTW..

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby modernist » Tue Jan 01, 2013 2:53 pm

It's a rare luxury to get two full days at the bench Jon but since it's taken me over two days already I would struggle to make a living at it, especially as the timber was £170, including the frame and I haven't made that or sourced the hardware yet.

leveller wrote:Probably a design issue but did you consider making the bottom rail wider to help prevent the door from dropping?. I would have filled the centre core with Birch play, fairly tight to help keep the door square.


It would have been quite a weight then! I wanted to keep the top and bottom rails fairly narrow to avoid the "English" look and I decided to use a single thick tenon rather than the usual 10 and 8mm double bridle. I am sure the diagonal brace will keep it all square and I may pop a peg or two into the joints as a guarantee. Although it is quite heavy it is lighter than it looks with the foam interior. It is surprising how much timber you lose putting on the rebates which are best done at this stage rather than as components.

Re the Columbian Pine I don't know if you remember how hard it can be to plane. The wavy grain tears really easily and I defy anyone to tame it with a normal plane. I tried a sharp finely set LN 4 1/2 but ended up with needing ultimate smoother, the Veritas BU, honed at 45 deg which if course did the trick.

It will be finished in Sikkens BL21 and 31 water based in Oregon pine (and will therefore need re-doing every 3 years).

Thanks for looking and Happy New Year
Cheers

Brian


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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby paulchapman » Tue Jan 01, 2013 4:23 pm

That looks really good, Brian. You did well gluing that up on your own.

Cheers ;)

Paul

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby jake » Tue Jan 01, 2013 4:31 pm

That's a very handsome door.

I think that's pretty quick working (not that my standards are any sort of measure!) especially for a first time one-off.

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby Mr Ed » Tue Jan 01, 2013 4:41 pm

A very interesting and well documented WIP Brian. I like the appearance of the finished door.

Ed

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby Doug » Tue Jan 01, 2013 6:05 pm

Looking good Brian.

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby cncpaul » Tue Jan 01, 2013 8:37 pm

Brian,

The door looks great, I think the shiplap cove will look great creating a nice shadow to accentuate the boards.
Paul

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby sainty » Tue Jan 01, 2013 9:08 pm

Looks great Brian.

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby mattty » Wed Jan 02, 2013 4:39 pm

Looks good Brian, i bet it was a bitch to put together!
Cheers, Matt.

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby siafins » Wed Jan 02, 2013 4:59 pm

Nice looking door, nice design.

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby ftacarpentry » Thu Jan 03, 2013 6:05 pm

That looks really good- I find certain pieces give so much more satisfaction than others, and this looks like one of them!

Those rutlands clamps are TERRIBLE. In my pre-crimbo clean up all 8 went in the skip (temporarily using ye ole' sash cramps until I can get my hands on some bessey's!!!).

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby modernist » Thu Jan 03, 2013 6:23 pm

Thanks guys, much appreciated. I did chamfer the ends of the board tenons or it would never have gone together. After all as long as the last few mm is full width each board will stay central.

It's resting at the moment as I am away this weekend so I'll get the frame knocked up next week and order some hardware.

After that I feel another table coming on :D
Cheers

Brian


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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby Leveller2911 » Thu Jan 03, 2013 10:19 pm

When machining the ends of boards to form the tongues on the spindle, if you raise the block up and machine over the top of the boards you get a consistant thickness on the tongues, nothing unsafe about it.If you spindle with the block cutting under the boards(as in pic) you can get variations in thickness of tongue and .2mm can mean the difference between a snug fit or needing a lump hammer.. :lol:

Like you,I always chamfer the ends of tenons... Looking good though

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby modernist » Fri Jan 04, 2013 7:18 am

I think I must have had a brain fade moment not to use dominos, buy hey ho, it's together for good now.
Cheers

Brian


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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby woodsmith » Fri Jan 04, 2013 7:19 am

Leveller2911 wrote:When machining the ends of boards to form the tongues on the spindle, if you raise the block up and machine over the top of the boards you get a consistant thickness on the tongues, nothing unsafe about it.If you spindle with the block cutting under the boards(as in pic) you can get variations in thickness of tongue and .2mm can mean the difference between a snug fit or needing a lump hammer.. :lol:


How does that work? As far as I can see if you machine it with the wood going over the block slightly thicker boards (in amongst your nominal sized ones) will give you a thicker tenon, thinner boards a thinner tenon but then as far as i can see machining over the wood just has the opposite effect, because you get thinner tenons with any slightly thicker boards and thicker tenons with slightly thinner boards?


Nice work Brian, I like the way you have housed the boards.
Keith

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby nickw » Fri Jan 04, 2013 8:03 am

Kieth, it's about reference surfaces. If you keep the underside of the board down, machine the bottom face of the tenon from underneath and the top from above, then the tenons will all be the same thickness.
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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby modernist » Fri Jan 04, 2013 8:41 am

I think Leveller is right, I can see what he is getting at. This tenon is bare faced on the back and if you use that as the reference surface with the block cutting from the top down then you are guaranteed identical tenon thicknesses i.e the distance between the block and the table which is fixed and locked off. Any variation in board thickness will be left in the front part and disguised by the ship lap rebate. Not that my boards come out different thicknesses you understand - from a Felder :shock: :lol:

EDIT

it also has the advantage of using the little used, and therefore normally sharp, bottom corner of the rebate knives.
Cheers

Brian


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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby woodsmith » Fri Jan 04, 2013 12:50 pm

Sorry I just read tenon and didn't realise it was barefaced tenons we were talking about, in which case it makes complete sense.

Nick your idea works but it means readjusting the spindle height half way through cutting the tenons. Then if you wanted to go back and cut another, the spindle would not be set up; not that I ever c*ck things up so that I have to go back and make a few more tenons, (where is that Pinocchio smilie when you need it :) )
Keith

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby noel » Wed Jan 30, 2013 3:07 pm

How's progress Brian? Finished or.....

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby modernist » Wed Jan 30, 2013 8:12 pm

noel wrote:How's progress Brian? Finished or.....


Have you been speaking to my wife? :lol:

This weekend for the frame.

My excuse is I've been away.
Cheers

Brian


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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby noel » Thu Jan 31, 2013 8:23 am

:)

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby noel » Wed Feb 27, 2013 10:14 pm

If I had your wife's number Brian I'd be making a call to her....:)

Well, how you getting on with it? Frame built? Nearly finished?

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby modernist » Sun Mar 10, 2013 5:37 pm

noel wrote:If I had your wife's number Brian I'd be making a call to her....:)

Well, how you getting on with it? Frame built? Nearly finished?


Just for you Noel, I've been cracking on :lol:

Moulded up the frame with double rebates. Hit the first problem in that the DF was so splintery that even with sharp scribes it still spelched out. I had to run the spindle backwards and climb cut the damage away and glue in a repair strip :twisted:

The double bridles at the corners need a cool and sober head as the dimensions get a bit complicated when you have to allow for the locks on one side only.

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All together

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As the rebate sizes are a bit special I had to make up a cill plate with a normal angle section and I sawed a stop out of a pice of thresh. I used the chop and bandsaw on this without problem which is the first time I've tried them on metal. I sawed the chamfer on the table saw then cleaned it down to scribed lines with a LN No6. It was a tough bit of DF which I had saved for the cill and it reminded me how important the balance of the plane is and why the original Quangsheng No 6 was unusable (they have altered the casting now to move the handle near the blade where it should have been in the first place).

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Changing the thresh detail meant I had to shorten the door a tad and alter the rebates and seal groove.

I don't have a T slot type router bit and didn't fancy balancing the track saw on the end of the door so decided to use the biscuit jointer which can cut a 20mm deep slot. I cut the other face with the track saw and the end result was perfect.

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Normally I'd cut the seal slot first but had done the track saw cut before I had the idea :idea:

This would be by far the best way to do the double rebates if I make another as the door is too heavy to take to the spindle.

Popped in a length of seal to check the fit - bang on.

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Well that's a few headaches out of the way.

I've decided to do all the fittings, locks and hinges in the shop then fit the frame and drop the door on together.

Don't hold your breath Noel :D
Cheers

Brian


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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby hercule » Mon Mar 11, 2013 6:07 pm

That is some fine work Brian. Your attention to detail is awesome
Look forward to seeing it its final position
Good work indeed

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Re: Euro style ship lap front door in Columbian Pine

Postby JHWBigley » Tue Mar 12, 2013 3:29 pm

Looking very smart Brian, really like the alu threshold.

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