Glazing units

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katellwood
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Glazing units

Post by katellwood »

Looking for a bit of assistance in sourcing double glazed units

Made these for my daughters property on a BCN

The application went in last april so apparently under previous u value criteria

What im after is where do your regular window makers source your glass, i:e: is it a local firm or an online firm

There are 28 units required so obviously looking for the best price

Any assistance greatfully appreciated
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Meccarroll
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Re: Glazing units

Post by Meccarroll »

Eco Glass Norwich is very good on prices: https://www.ecoglass.co.uk/
jfc
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Re: Glazing units

Post by jfc »

I use Christie glass in Mitcham https://christieglass.co.uk/
Bit of a drive but half the price of my local glaziers .
katellwood
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Re: Glazing units

Post by katellwood »

Thanks guys will make enq with both
Can either of you specify what unit I need for building regs.
I've rebated for 28mm (4-20-4)
woodsmith
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Re: Glazing units

Post by woodsmith »

It’s hard to find hard facts on double glazing spacing, there are so many marketing firms promoting bigger is better for gap size. From what I’ve managed to learn 4-16-4 is considered to be the most efficient spacing but a last year I fitted some A rated (coated, gas filled and warm edge) with a 4-12-4 spacing and these look to be possibly more efficient, from the amount of condensation that forms on them, as 4-16-4 units. One problem I have had is spacer creep with a black warm edge spacer, where the spacer bows up inside the glazing unit. A third of the units failed and when they replaced them a third of the new units failed in exactly the same way. Maybe not such a problem in UPVC windows but in timber ones it’s a massive pain. Hopefully this is just my supplier but maybe something to be wary of?
Keith
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Re: Glazing units

Post by jfc »

Christie glass will be able to advise you but i use A rated units . This is 4 / 12 / 4 as 20 mm fits into my 45 mm windows . This is made up of 4 float 12 warm edge spacer , argon gas , 4 low e .
Meccarroll
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Re: Glazing units

Post by Meccarroll »

24mm is pretty standard for sealed units. There are generally a couple of recognised methods for bedding in the sealed units:

1. Drained method using tapes etc to seal between and around the unit and frame. Holes are drilled in the frame to allow any trapped moisture to escape.

2. fully sealed with a propriety glazing sealant. With this method there should be no moisture getting in the rebates but it does or can have problems.

With method 2 you have to be very careful to select the correct sealant that will not have an adverse effect of the sealed units edge spacer. Some so called glazing sealants will damage the edge spacer.
katellwood
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Re: Glazing units

Post by katellwood »

All

Thanks for all the help,

Jason, Took a ride over to Christie glass today, ordered all my units and what a great price. opted for 4-16-4 argon filled as they stated that 4-12-4 couldnt be properly certified as U 1.2 as still in the verification stage whatever that means, also the BCO will need verification of the U value which they will supply.

Going to fit them with a butyl tape of the inside then silfix u9 low modulus around the units with a bead on the outside bedded to the glass with silfix

Thought about the drain method but the majority are fixed casements and as such wont be able to drain the upper casements

Thanks all asgain

Chris
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Re: Glazing units

Post by Meccarroll »

katellwood wrote: Fri Mar 31, 2023 3:28 pm All

Thanks for all the help,

Jason, Took a ride over to Christie glass today, ordered all my units and what a great price. opted for 4-16-4 argon filled as they stated that 4-12-4 couldnt be properly certified as U 1.2 as still in the verification stage whatever that means, also the BCO will need verification of the U value which they will supply.

Going to fit them with a butyl tape of the inside then silfix u9 low modulus around the units with a bead on the outside bedded to the glass with silfix

Thought about the drain method but the majority are fixed casements and as such wont be able to drain the upper casements

Thanks all asgain

Chris
You can drain fixed sashes on the lower beads by giving them an overhang over the sash/frame and routeing or spindle moulding a scalloped interment drain point in the lower bead. You just have to enable a drain point for the system to work. I did it on my fathers bay window which has both fixed and opening glazed sections. It has worked just fine for about 10 years now (no failed units). Fully sealed units should work but may also be more prone to a vacuum effect. Either way should work if you make sure the drained system actually drains or the sealed system is actually fully sealed. Sealant looks a good choice. Mark
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